ARCHIVED - Investment Plan 2011/12 - 2015/16

Warning This information has been archived because it is outdated and no longer relevant.

Archived Content

Information identified as archived on the Web is for reference, research or recordkeeping purposes. It has not been altered or updated after the date of archiving. Web pages that are archived on the Web are not subject to the Government of Canada Web Standards. As per the Communications Policy of the Government of Canada, you can request alternate formats by contacting us.

APPENDIX A: CCG ASSET BASE DETAILS

Assets by category

A breakdown of the 15,211 assets that form the Coast Guard’s asset base is provided in Table 14 by category, program area and level of historic cost.

Table 14: Number of Capital Assets, by Level of Historic Cost
Asset Type Historic Cost between $10K & $250K Historic Cost between $250K & $1M Historic Cost over $1M Total Number of Assets
 
Program Infrastructure
Aids to Navigation 8,994 24 12 9,030
Waterways Management 21 0 0 21
Marine Communications and Traffic Services 2,468 59 15 2,542
Icebreaking Services 24 4 0 28
Search and Rescue Services 327 1 0 328
Environmental Response Services 878 12 0 890
Life-Cycle Asset Management Services 1,052 15 2 1,069
Coast Guard College 157 1 2 160
Subtotal Program Infrastructure 13,921 116 31 14,068
 
Fleet ¹
Vessels 2 20 90 112
Air Cushion Vehicles 0 0 4 4
Helicopters 0 6 17 23
Small Craft and Other Assets 932 68 4 1,004
Subtotal Fleet 934 94 115 1,143
 
Total 14,855 210 146 15,211

¹ Only operational assets are included.

Please note that this table contains counts of individual assets with acquisition costs of over $10,000. The Agency has significant additional investment requirements for equipment and material across these programs for items whose acquisition cost is less than $10,000 (and therefore which fall below the standard Government of Canada definition of an asset). In particular, the Aids to Navigation program has more than 17,000 individual items that require periodic replacement, resulting in significantly higher investment requirements than are implied by looking only at items valued over $10,000.

Assets by region

The distribution of assets across the country is displayed in Table 15. Coast Guard assets are widely distributed across the country, in accordance with the vast amounts of coastlines and waterways in which the Agency provides services to Canadians. Most major vessels and helicopters are registered in the National Capital Region and assigned to the regions based on operational requirements.

Table 15: Asset Count by Type and Region
Region Fleet Life-Cyle Asset Management Coast Guard College Maritime Services Total
Pacific 291 206 0 2,065 2,562
Central and Arctic 186 261 0 6,751 7,198
Québec 105 196 0 1,540 1,841
Maritimes 192 204 0 772 1,168
Newfoundland and Labrador 189 190 0 1,642 2,021
National Capital Region 180 12 160 69 421
Total 1,143 1,069 160 12,839 15,211

Additional Information on Fleet Assets

Operational vs. Total Assets

While the Canadian Coast Guard owns a fleet of 129 vessels, its operational fleet is smaller, consisting of only 116 vessels. The remaining 13 vessels are:

  • used for training purposes;
  • surplus to requirements or past their operational life and awaiting disposal;
  • awaiting significant investment (e.g. repairs) before they can be returned to the operational fleet; or
  • held in reserve to back-fill any sudden/emergency vessel failures within the operational fleet.
Vessel Classes and Age Description

Coast Guard operates a fleet 116 vessels belonging to 16 different vessel classes. Of these 39 large vessels are broken down in ten vessel classes (including the new Polar Icebreaker class) and 77 small vessels belong to six vessel classes. In addition to vessels, Coast Guard’s fleet is also composed of 23 helicopters. The table below provide the total breakdown of the fleet by class and an overview of each class’s age profile.

Table 16: Count and Age of Vessels by Vessel Class, as of April 1, 2010
Class Count Asset Age
Over 25 Years 15 to 25 Years Under 15 Years
Large Vessels
Polar Icebreakers 0 0 0 0
Heavy Icebreakers 2 1 1 0
Medium Icebreakers 4 3 1 0
High Endurance Multi-Tasked Vessels 7 1 6 0
Medium Endurance Multi-Tasked Vessels 5 3 2 0
Offshore Patrol Vessels 4 3 1 0
Mid-Shore Patrol Vessels 7 4 3 0
Offshore Oceanographic Science Vessels 2 1 1 0
Offshore Fishery Science Vessels 4 4 0 0
Air Cushion Vehicles 4 1 0 3
Subtotal Large Vessels 39 21 15 3
 
Small Vessels
Special Navaids Vessels 2 1 1 0
SAR Lifeboats 41 21 10 10
Hydrographic Survey Vessels 5 2 3 0
Channel Survey and Sounding Vessels 2 1 1 0
Near-Shore Fishery Research Vessels 5 1 4 0
Specialty Vessels 22 9 8 5
Subtotal Small Vessels 77 35 27 15
 
Helicopters 23 9 13 1
 
Total 139 65 55 19

Approximately forty-seven percent of the operational fleet is over the age of twenty-five years. Another forty percent is between fifteen and twenty-five years old, leaving only fourteen percent of vessels and helicopters under fifteen years of age. According to recommendations made from the shipbuilding industry and Coast Guard’s own standards, the operational life of large vessels ranges from twenty-five to fourty-five years, while that of smaller vessels vary from fifteen to twenty years and helicopters are expected to have an operational life of approximately thirty years. Although the overall condition of the small vessel fleet is acceptable due to recent investments, many of the large vessels are close to or well beyond their operational life. As a result, they are in need of replacement and require significant investment.