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Section 5: What We Do Every Day

This section describes, by PPA Sub-Activity, the day-to-day activities related to the programs and services Coast Guard provides to Canadians. It also highlights areas where significant investment is occurring and notes key initiatives aimed at improving the delivery of programs and services.

Overview of Financial and Human Resources

Table 2: CCG Planned Spending by PAA Sub-activity, 2010-2011 (thousands of dollars)

PAA Sub-activity

Salary

Other Operations and
Maintenance (O&M)

Total Operating

Major Capital

Grants and Contributions

Total Planned Spending**

Aids to Navigation Services

12,301.2

11,919.7

24,220.9

-

-

24,220.9

Waterways Management Services

2,997.5

6,434.5

9,432.0

-

-

9,432.0

Marine Communication and Traffic Services

33,197.3

6,360.9

39,558.2

-

-

39,558.2

Icebreaking Services

948.6

18,375.3

19,323.9

-

-

19,323.9

Search and Rescue Services

11,228.2

16,182.9

27,411.1

-

4,921.0

32,332.1

Environmental Response Services

6,185.9

2,902.0

9,088.0

-

-

9,088.0

Maritime Security

5,788.3

6,463.3

12,251.5

-

-

12,251.5

Coast Guard College

8,063.0

4,349.1

12,412.1

-

-

12,412.1

Coast Guard Fleet Operational Readiness *

175,239.3

67,016.0

242,255.2

229,395.7

-

471,650.9

Lifecycle Asset Management Services

53,463.7

25,856.7

79,320.3

57,799.9

-

137,120.2

Total

309,413.0

165,860.4

475,273.4

287,195.6

4,921.0

767,390.0

* O&M includes fuel for FAM, Science & NAFO
** Excludes Vote-Netted Revenue (VNR)

Table 3: CCG Service Costs by PAA Sub-activity, 2010-2011 (thousands of dollars)

PAA Sub-activity

Direct Program Operating

Allocation of Operating From:

Total Service Cost (Operating)

Coast Guard Fleet Operational Readiness

Lifecycle Asset Management Services

Aids to Navigation Services

24,220.9

37,947.5

33,451.2

95,619.6

Waterways Management Services

9,432.0

965.6

682.9

11,080.5

Marine Communication and Traffic Services

39,558.2

1,316.1

16,020.6

56,894.9

Icebreaking Services

19,323.9

39,421.7

9,353.5

68,099.1

Search and Rescue Services

27,411.1

86,266.5

16,375.3

130,053.0

Environmental Response Services

9,088.0

842.3

682.7

10,613.0

Maritime Security

12,251.5

14,595.6

2,575.7

29,422.9

Coast Guard College

12,412.1

-

178.4

12,590.5

Total Coast Guard Program

153,697.9

181,355.3

79,320.3

414,373.5

Science

N/A

37,040.6

-

37,040.6

Conservation & Protection

N/A

23,859.3

-

23,859.3

Northwest Atlantic Fisheries Organization

N/A

 

-

N/A

Total

153,697.9

242,255.2

79,320.3

475,273.4



Table 4: Total Number of CCG Full-time Equivalents (FTEs), Utilization by PAA Sub-activity

PAA Sub-activity

O&M FTEs

Major Capital FTEs

Total FTEs

Aids to Navigation Services

205.0

 

205.0

Waterways Management

41.0

 

41.0

Marine Communication and Traffic Services

436.0

 

436.0

Icebreaking Services

15.0

 

15.0

Search and Rescue Services

175.0

 

175.0

Environmental Response Services

86.0

 

86.0

Maritime Security

14.0

 

14.0

Coast Guard College

114.0

 

114.0

Coast Guard Fleet Operational Readiness

2,724.0

23.0

2747.0

Lifecycle Asset Management Services

876.0

128.0

1004.0

Total

4,686.0

151.0

4,837.0

Figure 3: Financial Allocations by Region, 2010-2011

Figure 3: Financial Allocations by Region, 2010-2011

* Funding in NCR includes a total of $18m related to national programs - these funds will ultimately be spent in the regions; distribution of those funds has not yet occurred.

Services by PAA Sub-activity

Aids to Navigation

2009-2010 Accomplishments

Aids to Navigation

  • Completed the modernization of three aids to navigation directives.
  • Produced an AToN21 project close-out report.

The Aids to Navigation program provides marine aids to navigation such as short-range marine aids — including visual aids (fixed aids and buoys), sound aids (fog horns), and radar aids (reflectors and racons) — as well as long-range marine aids, such as the Differential Global Positioning System (DGPS). The program’s services ensure access to a reliable navigation system and support a safe, accessible, and efficient environment for the commercial marine transportation sector, fishers and pleasure craft operators.  As such, it is the cornerstone of Canada’s navigation system and provides essential support to many government priorities.

What we do…

The program helps mariners navigate safely and efficiently by:

  • Operating a system of floating, fixed, and electronic aids to navigation;
  • Monitoring the reliability and relevance of the Canadian aids to navigation system;
  • Ensuring the application of national standards for aids to navigation;
  • Providing and distributing safety information such as the Notices to Mariners (NOTMAR) and Canada’s List of Lights publications; and
  • Regularly consulting with clients at the local level regarding changes to any aids to navigation system to ensure that all users’ input is taken into account.

The Aids to Navigation program is delivered by…

  • CCG Maritime Services staff, who define and design the aids to navigation system. They manage the service by developing policies, standards, procedures, and guidelines. Through consultations and communication they monitor, evaluate, and improve program performance. In addition, they provide advice, and subject-matter expertise at marine-related intergovernmental and international fora. Maritime Services staff also maintain CCG’s Notices to Mariners website, which provides mariners with updated navigation safety information.

  • CCG Aids to Navigation staff, strategically located in nine locations across Canada, are responsible for providing aids to navigation services and navigational safety information to mariners. As well, there are approximately 109 lightkeepers, who are responsible for services at CCG’s major lightstations on the East and West Coasts of Canada.

  • CCG Fleet, which is the principal asset used by CCG’s Aids to Navigation program to tend and retrieve floating aids to navigation (buoys).

  • DFO Real Property Directorate, which is responsible for the lifecycle management of some major aids to navigation.

  • Various contractors, whom complement the buoy service work performed by CCG Fleet.

  • CCG Integrated Technical Services, which implements a lifecycle management system to ensure that both our electronic and traditional aids to navigation assets are capable, reliable, and available.

Who we serve…

The Aids to Navigation program’s main clients are the shipping industry, recreational boaters, commercial fishers, and pilots, as well as the various associations and committees that represent them.  The program generally engages with its clients to ensure they understand the program’s levels of service, to identify gaps in service delivery, and to foster meaningful exchanges to address user needs while ensuring that expectations are realistic.  Aids to navigation systems are reviewed in a cyclical rotation, with each system evaluated approximately every five years. Client engagement is accomplished through existing media, such as the CCG website, printed media, and various meetings and sessions with regional representatives.  The program also engages its clients via various fora, such as meetings of the National and Regional Canadian Marine Advisory Councils, the Regional Marine Advisory Boards, the Local Marine Advisory Councils and the Regional Recreational Boating Advisory Councils.

Looking Forward…

LORAN-C Termination of Signal

On January 7, 2010, the United States Coast Guard (USCG) announced that termination of the US LORAN-C signal and phased decommissioning of the US Loran-C infrastructure will start on February 8, 2010. All US LORAN-C stations are expected to cease transmitting by October 1, 2010.

The LORAN-C systems in Canada and the United States work in tandem. Once the U.S. service is discontinued, the Canadian system will not be operational. Consequently, Canada will also decommission its Loran-C system in 2010.

CCG continues to look at ways to leverage new technology, to ensure the safety of mariners and to consistently meet service standards to its clients. Thanks to CCG’s Aids to Navigation of the 21st Century (AToN21) initiative, the program now benefits from a lighting system relying almost exclusively on Light-emitting Diode (LED) / LED-solar technology. Also, where practical, buoys are now made of plastic, which greatly reduces reliance on large vessels for their tending and maintenance costs at CCG bases.  We are continuing to find ways to improve the way we deliver and maintain our services, such as the implementation of four-season lighted buoys that will reduce maintenance and provide mariners with enhanced capabilities, especially in the winter. In 2010-2011, the program will complete the modernization of its remaining aids to navigation directives, initiated under CCG AToN21. 

Furthermore, the program will support the government’s effort regarding the coming into force of the Heritage Lighthouse Protection Act, most notably by establishing a framework to guide the management of CCG’s fixed aids, which includes lighthouses.  The Minister has also requested a review of the additional services performed by lightkeepers.

The advent of e-Navigation and its many possibilities is also being monitored for potential impacts and opportunities, such as the introduction of virtual aids to navigation, along with the Automatic Identification System, to better meet the changing needs of our clients.  The program will also work toward standardizing the Levels of Service (LOS) provided to clients across CCG’s five regions.

Commitment

  Lead

2010-2011

 

Develop standard agreements with service providers to define roles and responsibilities.

DG, MS

CCG's five regions

Note: Fixed aids to navigation include structures such as lighthouses and sector lights.

Aids to Navigation Services

Provides these services…

Measured this way…*

With these targets…

Operational short-range aids to navigation systems ** 

 

Percentage of time an aid has been operating properly versus time it was expected to be operational (mission time), over a 3 year average 

 

99% 

 

Operational long-range aids to navigation systems **

Percentage of time DGPS signal is available versus time it was expected to be operational (mission time)

99%

Provision of navigation safety information that affects nautical charts and publications **

Percentage of on time publications of the monthly Notice to Mariners (NOTMAR) (12 editions)

100%

Arrow - down

To achieve this result…

Measured this way…*

With these targets…

Aids to Navigation systems and information facilitate safe and expeditious movement of maritime traffic

Number of ships other than pleasure craft involved in a marine accident due to striking (maintenance of a 5-year average)

< 80

* These are the performance indicators in the CCG Performance Measurement Framework.
** In accordance with Levels of Service and Service Standards (www.ccg-gcc.gc.ca/eng/CCG/WM_About_Ccg).

Table 5: Aids to Navigation Resource Profile, 2010-2011 (thousands of dollars)

Region

Salary

O&M

Total

Newfoundland and Labrador*

3,284.0

1,289.5

4,573.5

Maritimes

1,050.8

2,247.2

3,298.1

Quebec

657.0

934.0

1,591.0

Central & Arctic

983.6

3,046.0

4,029.6

Pacific*

3,927.8

3,109.6

7,037.4

National Capital Region

2,398.0

1,293.3

3,691.3

Direct Program Total

12,301.2

11,919.7

24,220.9

Coast Guard Fleet Operational Readiness Allocation

27,449.9

10,497.6

37,947.5

Lifecycle Asset Management Services Allocation

22,546.9

10,904.3

33,451.2

Total Service Cost

62,298.0

33,321.6

95,619.6

* Salary differences between regions are largely due to variations in activities related to lighthouses. Of 246 Canadian major lighthouses, 51 are staffed. CCG maintains 23 staffed staffed lighthouses in the Newfoundland and Labrador Region, 27 in the Pacific Region, and, for sovereignty reasons, 1 in the Maritimes Region. Canada is one of the few countries that continue to staff lighthouses.

Key Initiatives

Aids to Navigation of the 21st Century

The Aids to Navigation of the 21st Century (AToN21) initiative reaffirmed our commitment to innovation and continuous improvement, while maintaining our strong tradition of service and safety. In 2009-2010, a project close-out report was prepared, highlighting the successes of the AToN21 project and discussing the challenges encountered. Many of the project initiatives are now part of the regular operations of the Aids to Navigation (ATN) program.  For example, it is now standard practice within CCG to consider new technologies in support of our aids to navigation system. CCG is now working to complete the update of its governing directives for aids to navigation to ensure they reflect the new technological realities and today’s mariners’ needs; the modernization of these directives will be completed in 2010-2011.

 Commitment

In response to…

  Lead

2010-2011

 

 

Complete the modernization of the five remaining aids to navigation directives.

AG

DG, MS

Review of Lightstation Services

In Canada, 51 lightstations remain staffed (27 in British Columbia, 23 in Newfoundland and 1 in New Brunswick). The station in New Brunswick (Machias Seal Island) is being kept staffed for sovereignty purposes. In 2009, CCG advanced a plan to automate and destaff 50 lightstations in a gradual manner in British Columbia and Newfoundland and Labrador. The decision was based on the fact that automated lightstations in the rest of the country have been destaffed for over a decade without compromising marine safety.

Concerns were raised by some stakeholders regarding additional services provided by lightkeepers. In September 2009, the Minister asked CCG to undertake a further review of the additional services provided by lighthouse staff on Canada’s East and West Coasts.  In April 2010, the Senate Standing Committee on Fisheries and Oceans (SCOFO) has accepted to conduct this review.

 Commitment

  Lead

2010-2011

 

Support the work of the Senate Standing Committee on Fisheries and Oceans on the review of lightstation services.

DG, MS

Reinvestment in the Asset Base

We expect to spend $12.4 million in 2010-2011 on capital projects to refurbish, modernize, and/or replace these assets or their components: floating aids, minor and major fixed aids structures, visual and aural aids, and the infrastructure of the Differential Global Positioning Systems (DGPS) and related sites. For a complete description of these capital projects and related expenditures, see Annex A.

Waterways Management

2009-2010 Accomplishments

Waterways Management...
  • Monitored and provided information to users on the bottom conditions of Canada's 19 main shipping channels which represent a total of 823.9 km.

  • Provided water level forecasts for the St. Lawrence, St. Clair, Detroit, Fraser and Mackenzie Rivers.

Navigability in Canadian waterways is highly influenced by water levels and the bottom condition of shipping channels.  The monitoring and maintenance services provided by the Waterways Management program enable CCG to help ensure safe, economical, and efficient movement of ships in Canadian waterways.  These services also contribute to the maintenance of specific navigable channels, reduce marine navigation risks, and support environmental protection.

What we do…

  • Monitor channel bathymetry1 by surveying commercial channels to identify the bottom conditions, as well as restrictions on or hazards to safe navigation,  and provide this information to mariners, pilots and other stakeholders;

  • Provide water-depth forecasts in the commercial channels in the St. Lawrence, Detroit, St. Clair, Fraser, and Mackenzie Rivers;

  • Manage channel dredging in specific areas;

  • Maintain marine structures that help manage currents and water levels, wave climates, ice covers, sedimentation rates and patterns, and scour and erosion. These structures also reduce channel maintenance needs and prevent ice jams from forming, thereby, reducing CCG icebreaking needs; and

  • Provide guidelines and analysis on channel design and use, contribute to the international control of water levels in the St. Lawrence River, and operate the Canso Canal.

Map of monitoring and maintenance services

The Waterways Management program is delivered by…

  • CCG Maritime Services staff, who define and design the waterways management program. They manage the service by developing policies, standards, procedures, and guidelines through consultations and communication. They also analyze survey results, calculate water-depth forecasts to inform stakeholders and manage dredging projects. The Waterways Management staff continuously plan, monitor, evaluate, and improve program performance. In addition, they provide advice, guidance and subject-matter expertise through marine-related intergovernmental and international fora.

  • CCG Waterways Management personnel who provide highly technical expertise on questions related to the safe passage of vessels in the Canadian waterways. In particular, they offer mariners underwater information they cannot obtain elsewhere. Waterways management personnel are located in all CCG regional offices, as well as in Headquarters.

  • Canadian Hydrographic Service (CHS), CCG Fleet, and Environment Canada, which provide services such as conducting bottom-sounding surveys in specific waterways and providing forecasts of water-level depth so mariners can plan safe and efficient passage, and maximize their cargo.

  • Public Works and Government Services Canada (PWGSC), which provides services such as bottom-sounding surveys, dredging, and the disposal of sediments.

  • DFO Real Property Directorate, which is responsible for the lifecycle management of marine structures.

  • CCG Integrated Technical Services, which is responsible for the managing the hardware related to MARINFO communication system.

Who we serve…

The Waterways Management program’s main clients are mariners, pilots, the shipping industry, channel owners and operators, ferry operators, and fishers, as well as the various associations and committees that represent them.  The program generally engages with clients to share program vision and direction, identify perceived gaps or existing variations in service delivery, and foster meaningful exchanges to address user needs while ensuring that expectations are realistic. This is accomplished through the existing media, such as the CCG website and various printed media, as well as workshops and information sessions.  Clients are also informed through various fora, such as meetings of the National and Regional Canadian Marine Advisory Councils.

Looking Forward…

The Waterways Management program is influenced by the trend to bigger and faster vessels, increasing pressure to maximize water levels and channel depths for optimum loading, climatic change, safety manoeuvring limits, and the need to balance between environmental and economical interests. These issues increase the need to maintain our engineering guidelines for the design, maintenance and utilization of commercial channels. Users continue to ask for accurate waterways conditions such as water-depth forecasts and channel-bottom information.

In this context, the program needs to be constantly aware of innovations in technologies and management practices that can support more efficient operations. For instance, the Waterways Management program intends to produce two national directives to clearly define the provision of surveys and dredging services it provides.

Well-managed partnerships contribute to the efficient coordination of the program’s activities and help prevent duplication of activities with internal and external partners such as PWGSC and CHS (channel-bottom monitoring), and Environment Canada and CHS (available water forecasts). One example of a well-managed partnership is that with DFO Real Property for the maintenance and refurbishment of marine structures. Because many of these structures are in very poor condition, there is a need to jointly develop and implement an investment plan for them.

The Waterways Management program is continually evaluating and integrating new initiatives to improve the information it provides to its clients. For example, the program is deeply involved in the MARINFO project in Quebec Region, the AVADEPTH service in Pacific Region and in the definition and implementation of e-Navigation in CCG. The program is also finalizing, in consultation with key stakeholders, a national directive to specify the sounding surveys it provides for channels, identifying the bottom conditions, as well as restrictions on or hazards to safe navigation.

Commitment

  Lead

2010-2011

 

Update the engineering guidelines for the design, maintenance and utilization of commercial channels.

DG, MS

Complete and implement two national directives on surveys and dredging services.

DG, MS



Waterways Management

Provides these services…

Measured this way…*

With these targets…

Dredging of the Canadian portions of the Great Lakes connecting Channels and St. Lawrence River maintained and managed **

Percentage of number of kilometres of channel dredged vs. planned

100%

Main commercial shipping channel bottoms surveyed ** 

Percentage of number of kilometres of channels surveyed vs. planned 

100% 

Water Level Forecasts **

Percentage of on time provision of biweekly water level forecasts for the St-Lawrence (30 forecasts a year)

100%

arrow - down

To achieve this result…

Measured this way…*

With these targets…

Waterways management and information help ensure accessibility of main commercial shipping channels and contribute to their safe use **

Maintenance of a 5-year average for the number of ships other than pleasure craft involved in a marine accident due to a grounding

<111

*These are the performance indicators in the CCG Performance Measurement Framework.
** In accordance with Levels of Service and Service Standards (www.ccg-gcc.gc.ca/eng/CCG/WM_About_Ccg).

Table 6: Waterways Management Resource Profile, 2010-2011 (thousands of dollars)

Region

Salary

O&M

Total

Newfoundland and Labrador

-

38.0

38.0

Maritimes

884.1

867.8

1,751.9

Quebec *

1,109.8

3,716.1

4,825.9

Central & Arctic

82.3

760.4

842.7

Pacific

251.9

844.7

1,096.6

National Capital Region

669.4

207.4

876.9

Direct Program Total

2,997.5

6,434.5

9,432.0

Coast Guard Fleet Operational Readiness Allocation

698.5

267.1

965.6

Lifecycle Asset Management Services Allocation

460.3

222.6

682.9

Total Service Cost

4,156.3

6,924.2

11,080.5

* Includes $4,600.0K for dredging that is fully recovered through vote-netted revenue.

Key Initiative

Post-Panamax Study, St. Lawrence River

Given the increase in marine traffic that is widely expected to occur in the near future, Canadian ports are seeking ways to increase their competitiveness. Shipping industry representatives have informed us of their plans to use new-generation post-Panamax 2 vessels, especially on the restricted channel of the St. Lawrence River between Quebec City and Montreal. Post-Panamax vessels do not meet current CCG guidelines for allowing vessels to travel in both directions in some sections of the shipping channel.

At the request of shipping industry representatives, a risk assessment to aid in the decision to authorize wide-beam vessels to navigate the St. Lawrence River up to the port of Montreal was prepared, in partnership with Transport Canada (TC) and the Laurentian Pilotage Authority. A draft report was completed in 2009-2010. During 2010-2011, CCG and TC will analyze the recommendations of the report and propose next steps, which could include the implementation of the recommendations, additional analysis, or any other actions required to complete the study.  Although it was first planned for 2009-2010, this analysis will be performed in 2010-2011 with Transport Canada.

Commitment

Lead

2010-2011

 

Analyze the recommendations of the risk assessment report , in collaboration with Transport Canada and clients.

AC, Quebec

DG, MS

Reinvestment in the Asset Base

We expect to spend $515 thousand in 2010-2011, as part of the long-term objective to restore the charted depths and full design widths of the Canadian portions of the Great Lakes Connecting Channels.  For a complete description of the capital project and related expenditures, see Annex A.

Marine Communication and Traffic Services

2009-2010 Accomplishments

Marine Communication and Traffic Services...
  • Developed Competency profiles for MCTS Officers and Shift Supervisors.

  • Selected twenty-one new recruits from the two National recruitment processes to enter the MCTS Officer training program.

  • Began transmissions, on a test basis, for the navigational warning system for two Navigational Areas (NAVAREAs) in the Arctic.

Safety of mariners and environmental protection in Canadian waters is highly dependent on the efficient and timely communication of information. With centres located across Canada, the Marine Communication and Traffic Services (MCTS) program is CCG's communication backbone. By ensuring that an efficient communication system is available 24/7, the program contributes to the safety of life at sea, the protection of the marine environment, the efficient movement of shipping in waterways, and the provision of essential and accurate information to mariners. Its services are essential to deploying Search and Rescue and Environmental Response teams promptly and effectively to maritime crisis situations. MCTS is, in many situations, the only means by which a ship's call for assistance can be heard.

What we do…

  • Manage vessel traffic by providing timely information and assistance to vessels to maintain vessel safety and achieve efficiency;
  • Provide distress and safety communications and coordination to detect distress situations, and ensure timely assistance;
  • Provide vessel screening to prevent the entry of unsafe vessels into Canadian waters;
  • Manage an integrated marine information system that initiates the emergency response network and supports other government departments; and
  • Support maritime domain awareness by providing vessel information on maritime security to other government departments and to the CCG component of Marine Security Operations Centres (MSOC).

The Marine Communication and Traffic Services program is delivered by…

  • CCG Maritime Services staff, who define and design the provision of MCTS by developing policies, standards, guidelines, and procedures.  Through consultations and communication, they continuously plan, monitor, evaluate, and improve program performance. They also provide advice, guidance, and subject-matter expertise through marine-related inter-governmental and international fora.

  • Approximately 400 certified MCTS Officers, who work in 22 MCTS Centres strategically located across Canada, coordinating distress and safety communications and providing vessel traffic services to mariners, industry, other government departments, and the general public.

  • CCG Integrated Technical Services (ITS), which provides MCTS with critical engineering and technical support.

  • DFO Real Property Directorate, which is responsible for the lifecycle management of MCTS Centres. 

  • Environment Canada (EC) and Transport Canada (TC), through Memoranda of Understanding. EC supplies essential marine weather and ice information, and TC provides the regulatory regime for Vessel Traffic Services and ship radio requirements.

  • The United States Coast Guard, which manages (via a treaty) vessel traffic management in the Juan de Fuca Strait, and on the Detroit and St. Clair rivers (via a bilateral agreement).

Who we serve…

The MCTS program’s main clients are mariners - including commercial fishers, recreational boaters, commercial shippers and pilots- and various associations and committees that represent them. The program generally engages with its clients to promote understanding and to encourage feedback on the services it provides. This is achieved through existing media, such as the CCG website, Notices to Mariners and various printed media.  Clients are also informed through various fora, such as meetings of the National and Regional Canadian Marine Advisory Councils, the National and Local Marine Advisory Councils, and the Recreational Boating Advisory Council. 

Looking Forward…

The MCTS program is highly dependent on new technology driven by international fora such as the International Maritime Organization and the International Telecommunication Union; on changes in the marine transportation industry, which has seen the introduction of larger and faster vessels; and on heightened security concerns. Of particular importance for the MCTS program is the implementation of e-Navigation. The advent of e-Navigation, and in particular the introduction of the Automatic Identification System (AIS) and voice/data sharing network technology, is expected to offer opportunities for increased efficiencies in the delivery of the MCTS program and for a review of its service delivery model. For existing facilities, the program is highly dependent on good asset condition and life cycle support to ensure continuous operation; the program also requires a Service Level Agreement (SLA) with Integrated Technical Support (ITS) to ensure MCTS Levels of Service and standards are met.

The MCTS program has first to ensure its continuity. Twenty-five percent of the MCTS workforce, about 400 Officers, could leave during the next five years through retirement. CCG has made the recruitment of new MCTS Officers a priority, and 70 new Officers have been trained in the past three years.  An average of 20 Officers will be recruited annually in the coming years. For this reason, Radio Operations (RO) has been identified as an at-risk group in CCG’s Strategic Human Resources Plan.

Commitment

  Lead

2010-2011

 

Develop an SLA with ITS support for the maintenance of MCTS systems.

DG, MS



Marine Communication and Traffic Services

Provides these services…

Measured this way…*

With these targets…

Responses to distress and safety calls and coordination of SAR communications **

Number of calls received requesting assistance, based on benchmark of a 5-year average

7, 750

Screening and issuance of Vessel / traffic clearances to ships of 500 tons - gross tonnage or more entering Canadian waters (Great Lakes not included) ** 

Number of offshore clearances issued, based on benchmark of a 5-year average

13, 550

Issue Navigational Warnings **

Number of Notices to Shipping issued, based on benchmark of a 5-year average

13, 000

arrow - down

To achieve this result…

Measured this way… *

With these targets…

Safety of life at sea, efficient movement of shipping, and provision of essential information to mariners

Number of ships other than pleasure craft involved in a marine accident due to a collision (based on a five year average)

17

* These are the performance indicators in the CCG Performance Measurement Framework.
** In accordance with Levels of Service and Service Standards (www.ccg-gcc.gc.ca/eng/CCG/WM_About_Ccg).

Map of MCTS centres and remote sites

Table 7: Marine Communication and Traffic Services Resource Profile, 2010-2011 (thousands of dollars)

Region

Salary

O&M

Total

Newfoundland and Labrador 5,435.8 831.2 6,267.1
Maritimes 5,723.2 589.6 6,312.7
Quebec 6,378.6 409.2 6,787.7
Central & Arctic 4,574.2 1,710.7 6,284.9
Pacific* 9,239.3 1,973.8 11,213.1
National Capital Region 1,846.2 846.4 2,692.7
Direct Program Total 33,197.3 6,360.9 39,558.2
Coast Guard Fleet Operational Readiness Allocation 952.0 364.1 1,316.1
Lifecycle Asset Management Services Allocation 10,798.2 5,222.4 16,020.6
Total Service Cost 44,947.6 11,947.3 56,894.9

* Pacific region salary dollars are higher compared to other regions because of the need to staff more MCTSOs in response to the region's marine traffic volume.

Key Initiatives

NAVAREAs

NAVAREAs are geographical sea areas established by the International Maritime Organization (IMO) to coordinate the transmission of navigational warnings to mariners. In October 2007, the IMO confirmed Canada in its role as international coordinator and issuing service for navigational warnings for two NAVAREAs in the Arctic. The broadcasting and coordinating of navigational warnings will be done from Prescott MCTS Centre via the Inmarsat SafetyNET satellite service using the English language.

In 2009-2010, we finalized the planning of this international service. Equipment, such as satellite receivers and computers, was purchased and MCTS Officers were trained. With Budget 2010 providing the Coast Guard with $2.2 million, over two years, we plan to start the initial testing phase of the service in the summer of 2010. We will make appropriate adjustments to ensure an effective service is available and we will fully launch the NAVAREA transmission service in 2011-2012.

Commitment

Lead

2010-2011

 

Start initial satellite test transmissions of navigational safety information for the two NAVAREAs.

DG, MS

DG, ITS

AC, C&A

2011-2012

 

Launch the NAVAREA transmission service.

DG, MS

AC, C&A

Canada Shipping Act, 2001

The Canada Shipping Act, 2001 affected MCTS in two key ways:

  • MCTS Officers (MCTSOs) are have greater flexibility to direct regulated vessels for marine events deemed detrimental to safe navigation; and
  • MCTSOs now have a clearer role to direct only vessels under their authority, not all the vessels in a vessel traffic services zone.

Information sessions have been provided to MCTSOs, and all of our documentation pertinent to Canada Shipping Act, 2001 has been updated. CCG has also met with Transport Canada to discuss the development of an enforcement strategy to ensure compliance with the Act. During 2009-2010, we provided technical support to Transport Canada in the development of the new Northern Canada Vessel Traffic Services Zone Regulations. These new regulations were published in the Canada Gazette Part I on February 27, 2010. The government’s decision to implement the Northern Canada Vessel Traffic Services zone, making it mandatory for vessels of a prescribed class to report information prior to entering or leaving Canadian arctic waters, has extended the timeline for completion of the Northern Canada Vessel Traffic Services Zone Regulations. Implementation of the new Northern Canada Vessel Traffic Services Zone Regulations, along with continued support to Transport Canada on the revisions to the current Vessel Traffic Services Regulations, will take place during 2010-2011.

Commitment

Lead

2010-2011

 

Implement the new Northern Canada Vessel Traffic Services Zone Regulations, once approved.

DG, MS

Marine Communication and Traffic Services Technical Training

The development of a training framework for the MCTS program is critical to CCG operations. The MCTS training framework will include a variety of initiatives to support the MCTS workforce of about 400 certified MCTS Officers (MCTSOs) to ensure professional development and adequate recruitment.

In 2009-2010, work on the training framework continued with the development of a refresher course and competency profiles for MCTSOs. Twenty-one recruits were selected from the two national recruitment campaigns to enter the MCTS Officer Training Program and a second national bilingual recruitment process was completed. In 2010-2011, the refresher course for MCTSOs will be delivered. A national recruitment process, for both English essential and bilingual positions, will be run.

Commitment

Lead

2010-2011

 

Implement a refresher course for existing Marine Communication and Traffic Services Officers.

DG, MS

ED, CCGC

2011-2012

 

Review the Marine Communication and Traffic Services ab-initio development program 3.

DG, MS

 

Reinvestment in the Asset Base

We are making substantial investments in assets related to MCTS. A number of projects are under way, most of which are multi-year. We expect to spend $21.5 million on these projects in 2010-2011in order to refurbish, modernize, and/or replace the following assets or their components: information and operational systems, communication systems, communication equipment, communication towers; and site infrastructure related to these projects. For a complete description of these projects and related expenditures, see Annex A.

Commissioner's Commendation awarded to Patrick McQuarrie

On August 23rd 2009, after Hurricane Bill, CCG MCTS Officer Patrick McQuarrie detected a very faint call for assistance. The call was almost inaudible and garbled and could easily have been mistaken for radio interference. Mr. McQuarrie demonstrated the highest levels of professionalism by detecting the call, accurately determining the situation and issuing a Mayday Relay message immediately after deciphering the information from the radio transmission. This, coupled with an effective on-the-water response from a CCG Inshore Rescue Boat, saved the life of a person who had fallen overboard from a small aluminium boat that had capsized and drifted about 1.5 kilometres out to sea within 15 minutes of capsizing.

Nancy Hurlburt (AC, Maritimes), Patrick McQuarrie
Left to right: Nancy Hurlburt (AC, Maritimes), Patrick McQuarrie.

Icebreaking Services

2009-2010 Accomplishments

Icebreaking Services…

  • Conducted 97 escorts, in ice, in southern Canada from April 1st to June 28, 2009 for a total of 950 hours of assistance.
  • Conducted 32 escorts in the Arctic from June to November 2009 for a total of 1,577 hours of assistance.
  • Started a review of the Icebreaking Levels of Service to industry.
  • Promulgated icebreaking directives.

Given the harsh challenges the extremes of Canadian geography and climate bring to maritime traffic, icebreaking services are essential to ensure that shipping moves safely and efficiently through and around ice-covered waters in Eastern Canada and the Great Lakes throughout the winter, as well as during the summer navigation season in the Arctic. Icebreaking operations facilitate the informed, safe, and timely movement of maritime traffic and contribute to keeping most Canadian ports open for business year-round, thereby preventing flooding on the St. Lawrence River and supporting fishers, the marine industry, and numerous coastal communities.

What we do…

  • Respond to requests for icebreaking support;
  • Provide route assistance, ice-routing advice, and ice information;
  • Resupply isolated Northern settlements when commercial services are not available;
  • Manage flood prevention on the St. Lawrence River through the monitoring, prevention, and breaking up of ice jams;
  • Break out ice in harbours and ports;
  • Support Arctic sovereignty; and
  • In partnership with the Canadian Ice Service, provide ice information to marine shipping to ensure the safe movement of vessels in the winter.

The Icebreaking Services program is delivered by…

  • CCG Maritime Services staff, who define and design the icebreaking program. They manage the service by developing policies, standards, procedures, and guidelines. Through consultations and communication, they continuously plan, monitor, evaluate, and improve program performance. In addition, they provide advice, guidance, and subject-matter expertise through marine-related intergovernmental and international fora.

  • Maritime Services Regional Ice Superintendents, who work in Ice Operations Centres, ensuring that ice information is disseminated to vessels by radio, Internet, fax, etc.; that routes around ice are prepared and distributed to mariners; and that icebreakers are strategically positioned to respond to requests for assistance. Ice Operations Centres are located in St. John’s, NL; Dartmouth, NS; Quebec City, QC; and Sarnia, ON.

  • CCG Fleet, which operates 6 icebreakers in the Arctic between June and November and 17 icebreaking vessels for winter operations on the East Coast of Canada, the St. Lawrence River, and the Great Lakes between December and May.

  • A partnership agreement with Environment Canada’s Canadian Ice Service, which is administered by Maritimes Services headquarters program staff to provide CCG with essential marine weather and ice information.

  • A treaty with the United States Coast Guard for joint icebreaking operations on the Great Lakes, administered by Maritime Services headquarters and regional program staff to maximize icebreaking support capability and effectiveness for both nations.  

Who we serve…

The Icebreaking program provides ice information and icebreaking services to clients on ice-covered waters of the Great Lakes, the St. Lawrence River, the East Coast of Canada, and the Arctic. The program's main clients are mariners, including the commercial shipping industry, ferries, fishing vessels, ports, river pilots, ice navigators, shipping agents, and Arctic residents. The program conducts annual pre- and post-season meetings with its clients to share program vision and direction, identify perceived gaps or existing variations in service delivery, and foster meaningful exchanges to address user needs while ensuring that expectations are realistic. This is achieved through existing media, such as the Canadian Coast Guard website, icebreaking directives, and various printed media. Clients are also informed through various fora, such as the National and Regional Canadian Marine Advisory Councils, and the Arctic Marine Advisory Board.

Looking Forward…

Climate change and economic development have led to demands for extended periods of navigation through ice both in the South and in the Arctic. Given the need to maximize resource utilization in both ice operations and ice routing and information services, the program needs to be constantly aware of innovations in technologies and management practices that can support more efficient operations. Quality and readily available ice information is of particular importance to vessels navigating through and around ice-covered waters. Satellite imagery and enhanced marine radars, for example, can support the timely detection and recognition of dangerous ice, thereby enhancing safety and reducing navigation times. Well-managed partnerships are also essential for the efficient coordination of activities with internal and external partners. The Icebreaking Services program is continually integrating new initiatives to improve the information it provides to its clients.

A number of critical challenges are facing the program and its ability to deliver its advertised Levels of Service (LOS). First, the current icebreaker fleet is quite different, in both size and capability, from that which existed in 1997 when the current LOS were finalized with industry. In addition, the average age of the vessels that remain in service is quite high, and they are increasingly prone to unpredictable mechanical failures that either reduce their capability or remove them completely from icebreaking operations for substantial periods of time. Vessels’ increasingly fragile mechanical state, combined with the lack of reserve capacity to backfill in the case of removal of this resource for any reason, is the most significant issue facing the program today and into the near future.

As a result of an internal review of the Icebreaking program, a number of initiatives were begun in 2009 that will give the program a platform from which to move forward in the coming years. These include:

  • A review of the current LOS provided to the maritime industry. The original LOS were developed in 1990, were finalized in 1997, and are predicated on a much different fleet composition from the one that exists today.
  • An update of the Ice Information Services Partnership Agreement with the Canadian Ice Service.
  • An economic analysis and assessment of the benefit and impact of the services provided by the program to the nation.

The majority of vessels damaged in ice tend to be those engaged in the seal fisheries during the winter ice season. As a result of a recommendation in the final report on the L’Acadien II incident, the CCG issued new icebreaking operations directives in February 2009 that are intended to provide guidance to regional program personnel and program clients on icebreaking service delivery. There were no reports of vessels damaged in ice in 2009 (January to November), while there were 15 in 2008 and 25 in 2007.

Commitment

  Lead

2010-2011

 

Review the maritime industry’s icebreaking requirements, and amend the Icebreaking Levels of Service, as feasible and appropriate, in consultation with clients.

DG, MS

Renew and amend, as appropriate, the Ice Information Services Partnership Agreement (IISPA) with the Canadian Ice Service (CIS).

DG, MS



Icebreaking Services

Provides these services…

Measured this way…*

With these targets…

Icebreaking Operations:  vessels escorted, harbours and channels broken out, ice jams prevented, fuel and dry cargo delivered to northern settlements **

Percentage of icebreaking operations provided

100%

Provision of ice-related information during ice-seasons **

Number of ice charts produced

Specific targets TBD, in coordination with Environment Canada (CIS) through the IISPA (a 5 year agreement)

Re-supply of Northern communities for which there is no commercial service **

Percentage of CCG northern re-supply cargo (in metric tonnes) delivered, as requested in the agreements with Nunavut and Environment Canada, compared to the Fleet Operations plan

100%

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To achieve this result…

Measured this way…*

With these targets…

Informed, safe and timely movement of maritime traffic through and around ice-covered waters is facilitated

Number of ships other than pleasure craft damaged by ice (maintain a 5-year average)

≤12

* These are the performance indicators in the CCG Performance Measurement Framework.
** In accordance with Levels of Service and Service Standards (www.ccg-gcc.gc.ca/eng/CCG/WM_About_Ccg).

Table 8: Icebreaking Services Resource Profile, 2010-2011 (thousands of dollars)

Region

Salary

O&M

Total

Newfoundland and Labrador 61.1 2,048.8 2,109.9
Maritimes 91.7 3,028.2 3,119.9
Quebec 159.1 2,904.9 3,064.0
Central & Arctic 82.4 943.9 1,026.3
Pacific - 236.5 236.5
National Capital Region 554.4 9,213.0 9,767.3
Direct Program Total 948.6 18,375.3 19,323.9
Coast Guard Fleet Operational Readiness Allocation 28,516.3 10,905.4 39,421.7
Lifecycle Asset Management Services Allocation 6,304.4 3,049.0 9,353.5
Total Service Cost 35,769.4 32,329.7 68,099.1

Search and Rescue Services

2009-2010 Accomplishments

Search and Rescue Services…

  • Coordinated the response to over 8,000 SAR cases across the country.
  • Completed an analysis of the CCG SAR mission coordinators’ workload in all five rescue centres.

Canada is a maritime nation bounded by three oceans whose population and economy make significant use of waterways for commercial and recreational purposes. The marine environment can be dangerous and CCG is an important player in responding to emergencies that occur on water.

The federal Search and Rescue (SAR) program is a cooperative effort by federal, provincial and municipal governments. CCG’s SAR program leads, delivers, and maintains preparedness for the 5.3 million square kilometre maritime component of the federal SAR system. It does so with the support of multiple stakeholders and partners, including the Canadian Coast Guard Auxiliary and National Defence. Through distress monitoring, communication, and search and rescue activities, the CCG SAR program increases the chances of rescue for people caught in dangerous on-water situations.

What we do…

  • Coordinate and manage the response to marine SAR cases, rescuing approximately 3,000 people a year across Canada and supporting the protection of human life at sea;
  • Assist the Department of National Defence (DND) with aeronautical and humanitarian cases;
  • Operate in-shore rescue boats during the summer season; and
  • Manage partnerships, which are essential for the efficient coordination of activities.

The Search and Rescue program is delivered by…

  • CCG Maritime Services staff, who define and design the SAR system. They manage service provision by developing policies, standards, procedures, and guidelines. Through consultations and communication, they continuously plan, monitor, evaluate, and improve program performance. They also provide advice, guidance, and subject-matter expertise through marine-related intergovernmental and international fora.

  • CCG SAR Mission Coordinators, who are strategically located in three Joint Rescue Coordination Centres (JRCCs) and two Maritime Rescue Sub-Centres (MRSCs) across Canada. These coordinators provide 24/7 SAR coordination services during distress and safety incidents.

  • CCG Inshore Rescue Boat (IRB) crews, who provide a seasonal Inshore Rescue Boat service.

  • CCG Fleet, which operates a total of 116 vessels, all with SAR responsibilities.

  • DFO Real Property Directorate, which is responsible for the lifecycle management of lifeboat stations.

  • A partnership with DND, which is the lead department for the coordination of all aeronautical and marine SAR and is responsible for the three JRCCs. The JRCCs are located in Halifax, Trenton, and Victoria, and they are staffed by both DND and CCG personnel. CCG operates two MRSCs, in St. John’s and Quebec City, which report to a Joint Rescue Coordination Centre. 

  • A partnership with the CCG Auxiliary, which consists of some 4,200 volunteers using 1,165 vessels that are either individually owned boats or community vessels.  The Auxiliary responds to approximately one-quarter of all marine SAR cases.

Who we serve…

The SAR program’s main clients are mariners — including commercial fishers, recreational boaters, and commercial shippers — and the various associations and committees that represent them. The program generally engages with its clients to promote understanding and encourage feedback on the services CCG provides. This is achieved through existing media, such as the Canadian Coast Guard website and printed media. Clients are also informed through various fora, such as meetings of the Arctic Marine Advisory Board; the National and Local Marine Advisory Councils; the Atlantic, British Columbia, and Canadian Councils of Fisheries and Aquaculture Ministers; and the Recreational Boating Advisory Council. As a committed member of the National SAR Program, CCG also plays an active role in the Inter-departmental Committee on SAR and works with its federal partners to share views among the organizations and their individual clients and stakeholders.

Looking Forward…

Continuing our efforts to ensure effective partnerships is essential to the future of the SAR program. In addition, the program needs to be constantly aware of innovations in technologies and management practices that can support more efficient operations. As such, improvements in information and knowledge management – for example, the identification of software system requirements in partnership with National Defence - will play a critical role in ensuring an efficient and effective service. There is also a need for Canada to develop and modify its SAR procedures to be consistent with international SAR processes, which are based on international SAR principles and practices. These changes will enhance the program’s ability to work in partnership and measure its overall performance.

Commitment

  Lead

2010-2011

 

Identify software system requirements, in partnership with DND, for SAR Mission Management System (SMMS) and Système Informatisé SAR (SISAR) improvements.

DG, MS

Develop a National Standard Operating Procedures document based on the International Aeronautical and Maritime SAR (IAMSAR) Canadian supplement (Volume IV).

DG, MS



Search and Rescue Services

To achieve this result…

Measured this way…

With these targets…

Prevention of loss of life and injury

Percentage of lives saved vs. lives at-risk.  This figure represents an operational benchmark, while the target – although operationally unattainable - is that CCG saves 100% of lives at risk

≥90%

Search and Rescue Services – CCG

Provides these services…

Measured this way…

With these targets…

Search and rescue alerting, responding and aiding activities using public and private resources **

Percentage of primary SAR vessels meeting reaction time of 30 minutes or less for maritime incidents

99%

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To achieve this result…

Measured this way…*

With these targets…

Coordination of Maritime SAR incidents**

Number of cases managed by Maritime SAR Program through the Joint Rescue Coordination Centre and the Maritime Rescue Sub-Centres, based on a benchmark of a 4-year average

6, 200

* These are the performance indicators in the CCG Performance Measurement Framework.
** In accordance with Levels of Service and Service Standards (www.ccg-gcc.gc.ca/eng/CCG/WM_About_Ccg).

Canadian Coast Guard Auxiliary

Membership…

The majority of CCGA members are commercial fishers and pleasure boaters who donate their time and vessels to assist the CCG Search and Rescue Services program. The remaining CCGA members are volunteers from local communities who crew community-based dedicated response vessels 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

The successful delivery of Auxiliary services depends on having competent and experienced people to discharge the various responsibilities of the Auxiliary. Training is the backbone of this organization. The Canadian Coast Guard assists the Auxiliary with the specialized SAR training necessary to become, and remain a member.

The Canadian Coast Guard Auxiliary (CCGA) is organized into six federally incorporated, not-for-profit volunteer organizations that parallel the five CCG regions, and one national corporation. The Minister of Fisheries and Oceans maintains a formal Contribution Agreement with each of the six CCGA corporations for related costs. The corporations are separate legal entities from the Government of Canada and work in close partnership with CCG.

Canadian mariners have a strong tradition of responding to distress calls from vessels in trouble. Canada’s vast and often inhospitable coastline, combined with unpredictable weather, has ensured that these situations are far from uncommon.  It is not possible for the Canadian Coast Guard to cover the entire coastline, and for many decades CCG has relied on the Canadian Coast Guard Auxiliary to supplement its response efforts.

Every year, CCGA responds to approximately 25% of all maritime SAR incidents in Canada and is credited with saving approximately 1,000 lives each year. CCGA has approximately 4,200 members and access to approximately 1,165 vessels. Members’ local knowledge, maritime experience, seafaring talents and professional conduct makes them one of Canada’s greatest maritime assets.

Search and Rescue Services – CCG Auxiliary

Provides these services…

Measured this way…*

With these targets…

Support to CCG SAR activities **

Percentage of Maritime SAR incidents in which CCGA participated

25%

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To achieve this result…

Measured this way…*

With these targets…

Maintain capacity to respond to SAR taskings **

Maintain the benchmark number of CCGA members

4, 266

Maintain the benchmark number of CCGA vessels

1, 209

* These are the performance indicators in the CCG Performance Measurement Framework.
** In accordance with Levels of Service and Service Standards (www.ccg-gcc.gc.ca/eng/CCG/WM_About_Ccg).

Table 9: Search and Rescue Services Resource Profile, 2010-2011 (thousands of dollars)

Region

Salary

O&M

Total

Newfoundland and Labrador 2,183.0 3,945.5 6,128.6
Maritimes 2,781.4 3,017.7 5,799.1
Quebec* 935.1 2,117.2 3,052.3
Central & Arctic 1,833.7 1,639.5 3,473.1
Pacific 1,750.4 4,081.0 5,831.4
National Capital Region 1,744.7 1,381.9 3,126.6
Direct Program Total 11,228.2 16,182.9 27,411.1
Coast Guard Fleet Operational Readiness Allocation 62,402.3 23,864.2 86,266.5
Lifecycle Asset Management Services Allocation 11,037.3 5,338.0 16,375.3
Total Service Cost 84,667.8 45,385.2 130,053.0

* In the Quebec region, SAR services are co-delivered with Operational Services; the associated salary dollars are included in the Fleet Operational Readiness sub-activity.

Key Initiatives

Search and Rescue Needs Analysis

A needs analysis of the Search and Rescue program has been conducted. The goals of the analysis, which included consultations and preparation of a report on CCG’s findings, were to assess the SAR resources needed to respond to incidents in the maritime areas for which Canada has accepted responsibility and to validate the existing Levels of Service or propose changes.

Search and Rescue services are delivered to different service standards across Canada. The SAR needs analysis reviewed, updated, and assessed all factors (e.g., traffic, meteorological, and incident trends) affecting the existing Levels of Service. In 2009-2010, CCG developed an action plan that identified which recommendations can be implemented over the long term.

Commitment

In response to…

Lead

2010-2011

 

 

Implement the approved 2010-2011 recommendations of the Search and Rescue Needs Analysis.

AG

A-Base

DG, MS

2011-2012

   

Implement the approved 2011-2012 recommendations of the Search and Rescue Needs Analysis.

AG

A-Base

DG, MS

Search and Rescue Capability

We continue to strive to address the most pressing operational human resource requirements to ensure the continuity of our services and to respond to the needs of our employees. In this regard, we have undertaken an independent workload review for SAR Mission Coordinators to identify human resource requirements within the five Rescue Centres. This independent study, which was completed in 2009-2010, identified a number of recommendations from an external point of view. Reviewing these recommendations and developing an options analysis will form the basis for selecting and implementing the appropriate recommendations. We will finalize the workload analysis recommendations and focus on developing an action plan to establish the best approach to implementing the approved recommendations.

Commitment

Lead

2010-2011

 

Assess the workload review recommendations, and develop an action plan to implement appropriate measures.

DG, MS

2011-2012

 

Implement appropriate measures, as defined in the action plan.

DG, MS



Commissioner's Commendations Awarded to Glen Saunders, Matthew Taylor, and Evan Gilbert

While on Search and Rescue patrol in Conception Bay, the CCG Fast Rescue Craft (FRC) CCGS 298, received a call from the Marine Rescue Sub-Centre to proceed immediately to Sow's Point, near Carbonear, Conception Bay. There, a 14-year old boy had fallen almost 40 metres down the cliffside into the ocean and had come to rest on the rocks. Because of the severity of the incident and the possibility of spinal damage, a full immobilization to a backboard had to be performed on the uneven rocky surface, which greatly challenged all of the rescuer's skills. It is challenging enough to perform such a procedure on a flat, stable surface and then transfer to an awaiting ambulance; to do so on the terrain where this team operated required diligence and dedication above and beyond any normal expectation of the performance of duty.

John Butler (AC, NL), Glen Saunders
Left to right: John Butler (AC, NL), Glen Saunders. Missing from photo: Matthew Taylor and Evan Gilbert.

Environmental Response Services

2009-2010 Accomplishments Environmental Response Services…

  • Participated in a joint exercise in the Arctic, Operation NANOOK 2009, with National Defence and other government departments.
  • Responded to 1,014 reported spills in Canadian waters between January and December 2009.
  • Completed the acquisition of first response equipment funded from the Health of the Oceans initiative.
  • Participated in a large-scale exercise off of Southern Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, involving CCG and several federal and provincial governments and private industry partners.

Given the amounts of oil and other hazardous materials that are shipped to and from Canada by vessels operating in the North Atlantic, North Pacific, and Arctic Oceans, it is critical that the Canadian Coast Guard be an initial responder to all incidents, when required, in waters of Canadian interest.  The Canadian Coast Guard is the lead federal response agency for all ship-source and mystery-source pollution spills into the marine environment, in waters under Canadian jurisdiction, and for the support of other countries under international agreements. The objectives of the Environmental Response program are to minimize the environmental, socio-economic, and public safety impacts of marine pollution incidents.

Environmental Response (ER) Services works to ensure that there is a coordinated and capable response to both ship-source and mystery-source spills into waters of Canadian interest. Effective environmental response requires significant resources, strong partnerships, careful contingency planning, and trained personnel. The program is also a major contributor to the federal marine response capacity.

What we do…

  • Establish an appropriate and nationally consistent level of preparedness and response service in Canadian waters; 
  • Monitor and investigate all reported marine pollution incidents in Canada and ensure an appropriate response. In this work, the program has a dual function:
    • Where the polluter has been identified and is willing and able to respond, the program advises the polluter of its responsibilities and, once satisfied with the polluter’s intentions/plans, monitors the polluter’s response and provides advice and guidance as required.
    • In cases where the polluter is unknown, unwilling, or unable to respond, the program assumes the overall management of the incident.
  • Maintain efficient communications with the program’s regulatory and policy leads and operational partners, including Transport Canada, Environment Canada, and the provinces.
  • Ensure Environmental Response program personnel are trained to function under a nationally consistent emergency management system that deploys assets and resources appropriately and is capable of rapid and systemic escalation of responses in all regions of Canada.

The Environmental Response program is delivered by…

  • CCG Maritime Services staff, who define and design environmental response operations. They manage the service by developing policies, standards, procedures, and guidelines. Through consultations and communication, they continuously plan, monitor, evaluate, and improve program performance. They also provide advice, guidance and subject-matter expertise through marine-related intergovernmental and international fora.

  • CCG Environmental Response personnel, who have extensive expertise identifying, analyzing, developing, and executing the preparedness and response activities essential to minimizing the environmental impacts of marine pollution events.

  • CCG Fleet, which operates CCG’s vessels in support of Environmental Response operations.

  • Other DFO sectors, including Ecosystems and Fisheries Management, and Oceans and Science, which provide the relevant information and advice CCG to assist in the appropriate response to a spill.

  • Environment Canada (EC) and Transport Canada (TC), through Memoranda of Understanding. EC provides environmental and scientific advice during a response to a marine pollution incident and provides advice in the development and maintenance of contingency plans. In addition, EC ensures regulatory enforcement and compliance under the Fisheries Act. TC provides the regulatory framework for the Canada’s Marine Oil Spill Preparedness and Response Regime, provides technical advice with respect to vessels, and ensures enforcement and compliance. TC is also responsible for the overall review of national capacity and for ensuring that appropriate resources are in place.

  • Response organizations, which may assist polluters in their response; CCG monitors this response.

  • Ports and foreign governments, through bilateral agreements, Memoranda of Understanding, and contingency plans that ensure all available resources can be used to mitigate the effects of pollution.

Who we serve…

Given its role of ensuring an appropriate and effective response to all ship-source and mystery-source pollution spills into waters under Canadian jurisdiction, the primary client for the program is the Canadian public in general, followed by the shipping industry, Transport Canada, Environment Canada, and other federal and provincial government departments and agencies that have environmental or emergency jurisdiction.  The program generally engages with its clients to inform them of their roles and responsibilities and to promote understanding, as well as to encourage feedback on the services provided.  The program also consults its clients on its service levels.  This is achieved through various media, such as the CCG website and printed media; as well as through various fora, such as meetings of the National and Regional Canadian Marine Advisory Councils, Regional Advisory Councils and the National Advisory Council associated with Canada’s Marine Oil Spill Preparedness and Response Regime; and various workshops, conferences, and exercises at the Regional, National and International levels. 

Looking Forward…

Renewing the program’s focus on preparedness and planning and working more closely with its federal partners will be key priorities for CCG in the coming years. This will require the reallocation of existing resources within CCG in a challenging fiscal environment. CCG will add strategic capability to the program in the form of new personnel with a focus on the key risks the program faces, as the program must be operationally ready to meet its objectives.

To ensure an effective, long-term Environmental Response (ER) Services program, the program will continue to review and update its current plans, Memoranda of Understanding, and agreements to ensure the program is able to deliver on Canada’s statutory obligations with respect to marine pollution incidents. The program must continue to assess its current and future ability to deliver on these obligations, especially where there are multiple spills or clean-up might be prolonged.

In response to a recently completed internal audit, the Environmental Response program will continue the work begun under the Strategic Program Framework initiative to develop and implement its program framework. Such work will ensure better program governance and will, among other things, respond to the observations and recommendations of the internal audit. In addition, the Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development is conducting a performance audit of pollution at sea that will probably be released in late 2010 or early 2011. It is expected that the audit will examine whether the federal government has taken reasonable actions and other measures to detect, prepare for, and respond to pollution from ships in Canada’s ocean waters.

The program has initiated a review of the National Environmental Response Strategy. This Strategy will capture all of the elements necessary for Environmental Response Services to develop, implement, and demonstrate the preparedness and actions necessary to respond to ship-source spills on waters over which Canada has jurisdiction.  Throughout the review of the Strategy, the program will continue to consult its partners.

Being prepared to respond to ship-source spills necessitates that ER Services maintain sufficient equipment and trained personnel. In 2009-2010, work continued to differentiate the ER equipment systems; such as unsheltered, on-shore, etc. This systems approach is being used to assess the appropriateness of CCG’s current asset base and to identify future reinvestment requirements.  The ER program, in coordination with Integrated Technical Services, will develop a National Equipment Strategy that will include life cycle and materiel management processes.  Furthermore, work will continue on the development of a National Training Plan and a National Exercise Plan.

Commitment

  Lead

2010-2011

 

Add new resources and strategic capacity to the program.

DG, MS

Revise and implement a National Environmental Response Strategy, including the engagement of federal partners.

DG, MS

2011-2012

 

Develop a National Equipment Strategy which will include Life Cycle and Materiel Management Processes.

DG, MS

Finalize the National Training Plan.

DG, MS



Environmental Response Services

Provides these services…

Measured this way…*

With these targets…

CCG managed spill responses **

Number of CCG responses to marine pollution incidents as On-scene Commander (OSC) (South of 60), based on a benchmark

620

Number of  CCG responses to marine pollution incidents as On-scene Commander (OSC) (Arctic Coverage Area; North of 60), based on a benchmark

10

Monitoring of private-sector response**

Number of CCG responses to marine pollution incidents as Federal Monitoring Officer (FMO) posture, based on a benchmark

470

Provision of expertise and resources to other government departments (OGDs) and organizations **

Number of CCG responses as Resource Agency, based on a benchmark

140

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To achieve this result…

Measured this way… *

With these targets…

Economic, environmental and public safety impacts of marine pollution incidents are minimized (by investigating, assessing and responding to all reported cases of marine pollution incidents)

Percentage of reported ship-source spills where CCG acted as On-scene Commander, Federal Monitoring Agency or Resource Agency

100%

* These are the performance indicators in the CCG Performance Measurement Framework.
** In accordance with Levels of Service and Service Standards (www.ccg-gcc.gc.ca/eng/CCG/WM_About_Ccg).

Table 10: Environmental Response Services Resource Profile, 2010-2011 (thousands of dollars)

Region

Salary

O&M

Total

Newfoundland and Labrador 975.6 400.9 1,376.5
Maritimes 1,020.2 260.3 1,280.6
Quebec 793.2 546.9 1,340.1
Central & Arctic* 1,273.0 608.3 1,881.3
Pacific 966.8 357.6 1,324.3
National Capital Region 1,157.2 728.0 1,885.2
Direct Program Total 6,185.9 2,902.0 9,088.0
Coast Guard Fleet Operational Readiness Allocation 609.3 233.0 842.3
Lifecycle Asset Management Services Allocation 460.2 222.6 682.7
Total Service Cost 7,255.4 3,357.6 10,613.0

* Central and Arctic Region has a higher salary budget than the other regions because its area of responsibility is slightly larger (to cover the services provided in the Arctic).  This cost also includes isolated post allowances that are not paid in other regions.

Key Initiatives

Health of the Oceans

As part of Canada’s commitment to conserve and protect Canadian waters, the Government of Canada, through Budget 2007, provided $2.2 million over three years to CCG to ensure Canada has the capacity to respond to oil spills in the Arctic. During 2009-2010, a Request for Proposals for the purchase of equipment and first-response systems was completed and the equipment was acquired ($1.5 million). In 2010-2011, we will complete the distribution of Environmental Response equipment packages in the Arctic.

Commitment

Lead

2010-2011

 

Complete the distribution of ER equipment packages in the Arctic.

AC, C&A

Brigadier General M. G. Zalinski

CCG is playing a key role in addressing an oil-pollution threat posed by the wreck of the United States Army transport vessel Brigadier General M. G. Zalinski. This vessel sank in the Grenville Channel in British Columbia in September 1946, entombing a cargo of munitions and an estimated 700 tonnes of fuel. The wreck, which lay largely forgotten, began leaking fuel in 2003.

Following an assessment of the situation, we developed an action plan and costed all of the components of the plan. During 2009-2010, we further refined the action plan and identified options to address the pollution threat. A technical assessment of the condition of the vessel and the disposition of the remaining fuel will take place in 2010-2011.  Further activities are subject to approval by CCG senior management and resource capacity.

Commitment

Lead

2010-2011

 

Implement the action plan, subject to approval by CCG senior management and resource capacity.

AC, Pacific

Reinvestment in the Asset Base

Environmental Response Services expects to complete the implementation on the Arctic Environmental Response Equipment capital project, part of the Health of the Oceans initiative, in 2010-2011.  We expect to spend $570, 000 to transport and deliver this equipment to the targeted Arctic communities, as well as to cover other related costs.

In the coming years, capital projects will emphasize the refurbishment and modernization of existing environmental response equipment. For a complete description of these projects and related expenditures, see Annex A.

Maritime Security

2009-2010 Accomplishments

Maritime Security…

  • Implemented Canada's Long Range Identification and Tracking System.
  • Acquired Secure Tactical Communications radios for CCG vessels.
  • Provided personnel, systems and equipment in support of the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games.
  • Published the CCG Maritime Security Framework.

Canadians and foreign trading partners expect Canada to have a secure maritime transportation system. To this end, CCG leverages its capabilities, including extensive vessel identification and tracking systems, on-water capabilities and maritime expertise, to make a significant contribution to national and maritime security. Since 2001, Canada has relied on strong interagency cooperation to ensure the security of Canada’s waters.  Within this federal multi-agency environment, CCG has become an integral contributor to Canada’s maritime security system, which in turn supports the federal enforcement and intelligence communities.

CCG is now a core federal maritime security partner and has received more than $250 million in national security funding over the past ten years. CCG provides value-added support to the achievement of federal national security objectives through enhancements to existing safety programs, including an increased fleet presence, the implementation of new vessel tracking sensors, and the construction of maritime security vessels.

What we do…

In support of national security, Coast Guard:

  • Supports on-water enforcement and responsiveness by providing well-equipped crews and vessels both on a program basis (as in the case of the joint RCMP / CCG Marine Security Enforcement Teams) and on a contingency event basis (as in the case of the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games).
  • Provides valuable vessel identification and tracking information to other federal departments to enhance Canada’s awareness of activities in its maritime domain. The recently launched Long Range Identification and Tracking (LRIT) System and the Automatic Identification System (AIS) are deemed by our partners to be critical to the enhancement of Canada’s maritime domain awareness.
  • Is a core partner in the two coastal interagency Marine Security Operations Centres (MSOCs), led by the Canadian Forces, and interagency Great Lakes – St. Lawrence Seaway MSOC, led by the RCMP, and provides crucial analyses of the movements of foreign and domestic vessels.
  • Offers, as a key member of the maritime security community, operational and strategic support to its partners through various interdepartmental fora, such as the Interdepartmental Marine Security Working Group, led by Transport Canada.
  • Is accountable for the provision of leadership and management of the national security file within DFO. 
  • Has established a Maritime Security group that works with CCG Headquarters and regional Fleet, Maritime Services and Integrated Technical Services representatives, as well as with DFO’s program experts in Conservation and Protection, the Canadian Hydrographic Service, and Science, to assess DFO’s ability to enhance its contribution to national security. 

Looking Forward…

Although CCG’s roles and responsibilities regarding the provision of support for maritime security are well understood within the current legislative framework, the interdepartmental community views CCG as a core maritime security partner and seeks our leadership in the delivery of initiatives and projects related to national and maritime security. Over the next five years and into the longer term, it is reasonable to expect that Coast Guard’s support of maritime security activities will increase. The complexities associated with interdepartmental collaboration and evolving interagency initiatives will require significant ongoing policy work. CCG must continue to assess the implications of a shift from a solely maritime safety orientation to a culture that is influenced by both safety and national security considerations. The CCG Maritime Security Framework document and the forthcoming CCG Contributing to Maritime Security document will provide the context for CCG’s contribution to Canada’s national security objectives.

Commitment

Lead

2010-11

 

Develop the document CCG’s Contribution to Maritime Security.

Deputy Commissioner, Operations

With a clear accountability to deliver activities and information systems that are critical to Canada’s maritime security, CCG will continue to enhance its security contribution to the federal enforcement and intelligence communities.  As LRIT and AIS (new vessel tracking systems) are fully implemented, CCG will focus on ensuring the reliability of these systems and ensure the consistent and dependable flow of information to our partners. 

The past five years has seen the establishment of dedicated CCG resources in ongoing maritime security and national security programs.  The joint RCMP/CCG Marine Security Enforcement Teams in the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Seaway area and a permanent DFO presence in the multi-agency Marine Security Operations Centres represent an evolution for CCG investments in maritime security from simply enhancing CCG activities to providing a collateral maritime security benefit for partners to making direct investments in ongoing interagency maritime security activities.

Maritime Security

Provides these services…

Measured this way…*

With these targets…

Provision of CCG maritime traffic information to Marine Security Operations Centres

Percentage of operational time versus total time to supply CCG maritime vessel traffic information, for usage at Marine Security Operations Centres

99.7%

Vessel support for the joint RCMP / CCG Marine Security Enforcement Teams program and any other vessels delivering maritime security support 

Percentage of MSET patrols/service delivered vs. service planned, as per the Fleet Operations Plan

100%

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To achieve this result…

Measured this way…*

With these targets…

Enhanced awareness of vessel movements within and approaching Canada's Exclusive Economic Zone

Availability of Long Range Vessel Identification and Tracking (LRIT) data feed from Canada's National Data Centre

Under development (LRIT system will begin operations in 2009/10)

Enhanced presence on Canadian waters

Percentage of total number of fleet operational days versus planned

100%

* These are the performance indicators in the CCG Performance Measurement Framework.

Table 11: Maritime Security Resource Profile, 2010-2011 (thousands of dollars)

Region

Salary

O&M

Total

Newfoundland and Labrador - 331.5 331.5
Maritimes - 3.7 3.7
Quebec 1,160.6 989.0 2,149.6
Central & Arctic 1,834.0 2,384.6 4,218.6
Pacific - 322.2 322.2
National Capital Region* 2,793.7 2,432.3 5,225.9
Direct Program Total 5,788.3 6,463.3 12,251.5
Coast Guard Fleet Operational Readiness Allocation 10,558.0 4,037.6 14,595.6
Lifecycle Asset Management Services Allocation 1,736.1 839.6 2,575.7
Total Service Cost 18,082.4 11,340.5 29,422.9

* The Maritimes Security Program is managed nationally from the NCR region.

Key Initiatives

Marine Security Enforcement Team

A key aspect of our increased role in supporting the federal maritime security agenda is the ongoing development of the joint RCMP/CCG Marine Security Enforcement Team (MSET) program in the St. Lawrence – Great Lakes region. The program characterizes Canada’s multi-agency approach to maritime security by leveraging existing departmental capabilities to collectively and efficiently achieve a national security objective.

Currently, there are four interim MSET vessels that will be replaced over the next three years with the commissioning of four new Mid-shore Patrol Vessels. Law Enforcement Familiarization Training is provided to all crew members and specific equipment has been installed aboard vessels tasked to assist in law enforcement operations. We will continue to critically assess our MSET role and undertake the planning needed to efficiently address any personnel or infrastructure issues.

We will also continue to work with RCMP and DFO Conservation and Protection personnel to identify the hazards inherent in on-water enforcement operations. This will allow us to review and adjust our procedures and practices to ensure the greatest safety possible for CCG personnel and partner agencies.

Marine Security Operations Centres

DFO/CCG will continue to proactively participate in the multi-departmental Marine Security Operations Centres (MSOC) initiatives. The Canadian Forces leads this initiative on the coasts, while the RCMP provides the lead in the St. Lawrence Seaway - Great Lakes area. DFO contributes significant data on maritime traffic and analyzes this data to support the enhancement of maritime domain awareness on Canada's three coasts and in the St. Lawrence Seaway - Great Lakes area.

In 2010-2011, CCG will enhance this contribution through the full implementation of the Long Range Identification and Tracking (LRIT) System within the MSOCs. LRIT will allow MSOC partners to track vessels as follows: Canadian flag vessels - anywhere in the world; foreign vessels entering Canadian ports - anywhere up to 2,000 nautical miles from Canadian waters; and foreign vessels transiting through our coastal waters - anywhere up to 1,000 nautical miles from Canada’s shores, including the Arctic.

Staffing of Coast Guard positions in both the Coastal and Great Lakes - St. Lawrence Seaway MSOCs, culminating in a 24/7 Coast Guard capacity within the three MSOCs, will be a priority in the coming years. National staffing processes began in 2009 and will continue into 2010. The goal is to place CCG MSOC personnel in accordance with the interim operating capacities established for the Centres.

Automatic Identification System (AIS)

AIS is a vessel tracking system that automatically provides updates on vessel positions and other relevant ship voyage data to a marine traffic operators. The purpose of AIS is to enhance Coast Guard’s ability to identify and monitor maritime traffic in near-real-time with accurate and detailed information, allowing for an enhanced awareness of vessels approaching and operating in Canadian waters. In addition to the considerable expansion of vessel traffic data available to the maritime security enforcement and intelligence communities, there is the obvious safety benefit of avoiding collisions avoidance and being aware of vessel traffic.

The Canadian Coast Guard is responsible for the construction and operation of the shore-based component of the national AIS network, which consists of the installation of AIS shore-based stations at specific locations to track vessels within 40 to 50 nautical miles of the shore (called VHF AIS, or Very High Frequency AIS).

AIS shore infrastructure has been integrated within Marine Communication and Traffic Services (MCTS) Centres resulting in 19 MCTS Centres and over 100 radio sites being fitted with AIS systems. In addition to managing shipping traffic in general, MCTS will provide an AIS data feed to other government departments such as the Canadian Forces, as well as to the MSOCs on both coasts and in the Great Lakes.

Commitment

Lead

2010-2011

 

Complete the AIS project as per the initial project plan and ensure full operational capability of the system.

DG, ITS

Implement national AIS support in the regions.

ACs

Long Range Identification and Tracking System (LRIT)

LRIT is an integral part of the International Maritime Organization’s efforts to further enhance maritime security. Using satellite technology, LRIT allows for the tracking of SOLAS (International Convention for the Safety of Life of Sea) class vessels entering or transiting Canadian waters and of Canadian SOLAS class vessels operating internationally. Canada, through CCG, continues to lead the implementation of the international LRIT system and is working with national and international partners to ensure the long-term sustainability of this important vessel tracking system.

With LRIT, Canada is able to identify and track an estimated 1,000 additional ships a day. This data will significantly enhance Canada’s maritime domain awareness and will be shared with partners in the Canadian security, enforcement, and intelligence communities. LRIT is also being used by CCG to successfully track foreign flag vessels engaged in Arctic voyages, with Canada’s area of entitlement for data extending over the North Pole. LRIT will also benefit search and rescue by identifying vessels of opportunity in the area of a vessel in distress.

In fiscal year 2009-2010, CCG’s leadership in the development of the international LRIT system was recognized both nationally and internationally, with several employees receiving awards, including a Distinguished Public Service Award from the Commandant of the United States Coast Guard.

Commitment

Lead

2010-2011

 

Fully implement LRIT nationwide.

Deputy Commissioner, Operations

Reinvestment in the Asset Base

We are investing in critical surveillance and tracking systems in support of enhanced maritime security. We expect to spend $3.6 million on AIS/LRIT in 2010-2011, $25 million over the life of the project.

For a full description and a complete list of projects, see Annex A.

Fleet Operational Readiness

2009-2010 Accomplishments

Fleet Operational Readiness

  • Implemented Service Level Agreements with Science and Fisheries and Aquaculture Management with regular client follow-up.
  • Completed the Architectural Design of the iFleet system. Developed and published an intranet-based Fleet Management E-manual.
  • Finalized a standardized crewing matrix predicated on competency (crewing) profiles.
  • Ensured a high level of CCG Fleet support to the security community for a successful 2010 Olympics in Vancouver.
  • Substantially completed and updated the Fleet Renewal Plan.
  • Published the CCG Vessel Maintenance Management Policy and Governance document.
  • Completed assessments of vessel condition.

The Fleet Operational Readiness program involves the provision of safe, reliable, available, and operationally capable ships and helicopters with competent and professional crews ready to respond to on-water and marine-related needs. This Program Sub-activity involves fleet management, fleet acquisition, refit and maintenance, and the provision of fleet personnel. Through Fleet Operational Readiness, the Agency will ensure that the Government of Canada’s civilian fleet meets the current and future needs of Canadians and the Government of Canada.

In addition to supporting most Coast Guard programs, as well as the Science and Fisheries Enforcement programs of DFO, the CCG fleet delivers civilian marine services on behalf of other federal government departments or in support of the maritime priorities of other federal agencies and organizations. Such clients include the Department of National Defence (DND), Environment Canada, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP), the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada, Transport Canada, Natural Resources Canada, and the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada. Detailed performance information is published annually in the CCG Fleet Annual Report.

What we do…

Provide operationally capable ships, helicopters and marine-related competencies and around 32,000 operational days per year to:

  • Deliver on-water CCG services related to search and rescue, maritime security, environmental response, icebreaking, flood control, aids to navigation and waterways management;
  • Respond to federal maritime priorities and natural or man-made emergencies as a key player in various activities mandated under the Federal Emergency Response Plan;
  • Support DFO science activities and the conservation and protection of fishery resources; and
  • Support any on-water, non-military needs of other government departments (OGDs).

The Fleet Operational Readiness program is delivered by…

  • 116 vessels, 23 helicopters and over 2, 500 Ships’ Crew and Officers;
  • Round-the-clock operations in five regions, each with a Regional Operations Centre (ROC) that coordinates the tasking and deploying of vessels according to the Fleet Operations Plan; and
  • The National Coordination Centre (NCC), at Headquarters in Ottawa, which provides centralized coordination as needed.

Who We Serve…

In general, Fleet Operational Readiness ensures that the required vessels, helicopters and maritime professionals are provided to meet the evolving needs of the government. In particular, Fleet Operational Readiness provides service to:

  • CCG programs: Search and Rescue, Maritime Security, Environmental Response, Icebreaking, Aids to Navigation, Waterways Management, and Marine Communication and Traffic Services;
  • DFO Oceans and Science Sector and Ecosystems and Fisheries Management Sector  – Conservation and Protection; and
  • OGDs with on-water needs, such as Natural Resources Canada, Environment Canada, DND, the Canada Border Services Agency, Public Safety Canada, the RCMP, and Transport Canada (TC).

Looking Forward…

In 2010-2011, through the implementation of its annual Fleet Operations Plan, CCG plans to distribute its services among Fleet clients, as shown in Figure 4:

Figure 4: Planned Service by Program, 2010-2011 (in operational days* and scheduled maintenance days**)

Planned Service by Program, 2010-2011

* All or part of a pre-determined 24 hour period (a day) where the vessel is available to deliver service to a client – excluding scheduled maintenance, refit or lay-up.
** The number of operational days unavailable to clients due to Fleet maintenance requirements (vessel life extensions, refits, and scheduled maintenance)

Figure 5: Planned Vessel Costs by Program, 2010-2011

Planned Vessel Costs by Program, 2010-2011

In addition to delivering its own services to Canadians, CCG plans to support the programs of its clients as follows:

Oceans and Science

  • In 2010-2011, we plan to provide 3, 644 operational days of vessel time and over 342 hours of helicopter time to DFO Oceans and Science. While science-related activities are conducted on many of our multi-tasked vessels, 16 vessels in the fleet are dedicated solely to the scientific endeavours of DFO and other Science-based organizations.

Ecosystems and Fisheries Management

  • Conservation and Protection — In 2010-2011, we plan to provide 4,286 operational days of vessel time and over 273 hours of helicopter time to DFO Ecosystems and Fisheries Management – Conservation and Protection.

  • Ecosystems and Fisheries Management – Conservation and Protection activities supported by the Coast Guard include Northwest Atlantic Fisheries Organization (NAFO) patrols, support to the annual seal harvest, and fisheries enforcement.

Other Government Departments

  • In 2010-2011, we plan to provide 629 operational days of vessel time and over 635 hours of helicopter time to government clients such as Environment Canada, Natural Resources Canada (NRCan), and the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) for additional science-related activities, and to DND, the Canada Border Services Agency, Public Safety Canada, the RCMP, and TC for other non-military activities.

Coast Guard Fleet Operational Readiness

Provides these services…

Measured this way…*

With these targets...

Operational Days delivered for:

  • CCG maritime services (such as Icebreaking, Search and Rescue, Aids to Navigation, Environmental Response, etc.);
  • DFO Science and Conservation and Protection program requirements;
  • Other federal government departments and agencies' needs

Number of operational days of programming assigned to a CCG client.

100%

Fleet Renewal - Major CCG Fleet vessel acquisition

Percentage of major capital project milestones attained

100%

CCG Fleet Assets are reliable to deliver CCG/ OGD Programs

Percentage of days of planned availability / days of actual availability (availability is measured in the number of days on program)

95%

arrow - down

To achieve this result…

Measured this way… *

With these targets…

Safe and secure, effective and efficient provision of CCG fleet services for the Government of Canada

Percentage of service delivered vs. service planned for all programs (with a tolerance zone of 10%)

100%

Number of hazardous occurrences, as per the safety management system, based on a 4-year average

207

* These are the performance indicators in the CCG Performance Measurement Framework 2010-11.

Figure 6: National Distribution of Vessels and Helicopters, 2010-2011

National Distribution of Vessels and Helicopters, 2010-2011

Table 12: Fleet Operational Readiness Resource Profile, 2010-2011 (thousands of dollars)

Region

Salary

O&M

Total*

Newfoundland and Labrador 32,922.4 14,887.9 47,810.3
Maritimes 22,515.0 2,052.1 24,567.1
Quebec 24,354.3 6,016.2 30,370.5
Central & Arctic 19,388.4 1,873.3 21,261.8
Pacific 30,077.2 5,801.1 35,878.3
National Capital Region 45,982.0 36,385.3 82,367.3
Direct Program Total 175,239.3 67,016.0 242,255.2

* Includes all operational readiness costs, exclusive of fuel and acquisitions

** National maintenance funding and program management and administration funding

Key Initiatives

L’Acadien II Action Plan

On March 29, 2008, the fishing vessel L’Acadien II capsized while under tow by CCGS Sir William Alexander. Of the six crewmembers, two were rescued and four lost their lives; one of whom has not been found. To respond to this tragic accident, an Integrated Action Plan was developed to respond to recommendations from investigations conducted by the Transportation Safety Board of Canada (TSB), the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP), the Department of National Defence (DND), and Rear-Admiral Roger Girouard (retired). Rear-Admiral Girouard was appointed by the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans to independently examine the role and adequacy of CCG policies and procedures during the incident.

The Integrated Action Plan is being implemented. The commitments in the Plan are either on schedule or have been completed. Further detail and regular progress reports can be found on the CCG internet site.

Ongoing Improvements in Fleet Management

To sustain an operationally ready fleet capable of meeting service demands, Fleet management will continue to pursue internal efficiencies to optimize national consistency, organizational effectiveness, and linkages with regions and clients. With this in mind, the Coast Guard fleet will continue to examine how it conducts business and make the improvements needed to enhance service as part of the ongoing Service Level Agreement (SLA) pilot process. CCG Fleet will continue to invest in the improvement of its Fleet Activity Information System (FAIS), now known as iFleet (for details, see Annex A). The system captures the actual activities of Fleet vessels on an hourly basis and provides information to all levels of management. The system is essential to effective decision-making, planning, performance measurement, and reporting at all levels of management and to the public.

Improved Maintenance of the Existing Fleet

Subsequent to the 2007 Report of the Auditor General, the CCG Commissioner requested that a national review of CCG’s vessel maintenance program be conducted to provide an assessment and validation of the lifecycle management strategy for its vessels, including supporting systems, procedures, and operations.  The Vessel Maintenance Management Review (VMMR) resulted in 23 recommendations, out of which a three-year action plan was developed, and is now being implemented.

The activities to address the 23 recommendations include improving maintenance documentation such as plans and specifications, improving management processes and activities, clarifying roles and responsibilities, and improving CCG’s ability to prioritize and plan maintenance of CCG vessels. 

In 2009-2010, the CCG Vessel Maintenance Management Policy and Governance documentation, including the CCG Authorities, Accountabilities, Roles and Responsibilities Directive for Vessel Maintenance Management document, was approved by the Commissioner and published on the Vessel Maintenance Management intranet site. A number of vessel condition assessments were also completed, and the development of the Vessel Continuous Condition Survey Program was initiated. Finally, the concept of operations for the Centre of Expertise (CoE) for vessel maintenance management was approved in principle, and funding was secured to start the implementation of the CoE.

Commitment

Lead

2010-2011

 

Fully operationalize the Centre of Expertise for vessel maintenance management by funding and beginning to staff Phase I of the VMMR capital-funded positions.

DG, ITS

DG, Fleet

Put into practice the vessel maintenance management program process, in accordance with the Vessel Maintenance Management Manual, including the review process for the Vessel Maintenance Management Manual and the review and evaluation program for vessel maintenance.

DG, ITS

Implement the Vessel Continuous Condition Survey Program and deliver the vessels condition assessment report on the condition of CCG vessels.

DG, ITS

Finalize the five-year detailed plan for vessel maintenance for all vessels.

DG, ITS

Publish standard maintenance plans for ACVs and for 47-foot Motor Lifeboats (MLBs) and add them to CCG's Asset Management System.

DG, ITS

Implement standardized maintenance plans for ACVs and for 47-foot MLBs in accordance with maintenance plans in the Asset Management System.

ACs

Using MAINTelligence, monitor consistency in maintenance practices (based on maintenance plans) for type 1100 class vessels.

DG, ITS

Develop the standard general notes/services section for the refit specifications, as well as the general template to use when contracting refit activities.

DG, ITS

Human Resources Initiatives

The continuing development of Fleet Operational Readiness includes a variety of initiatives designed to support the fleet’s workforce. Seagoing personnel (Ships’ Officers and Ships’ Crew) represent fifty-one percent of the total CCG workforce. Shipboard occupations and the related operational environment experienced by mariners are quite distinct from those encountered by CCG’s shore-based personnel. Fleet’s 24/7 operations require the use of different crewing systems based on variations of hourly averaging, where employees work approximately 40 hours per week. Ships remain at sea for extended periods of time; the work is demanding and is often performed under difficult physical conditions. Additionally, while seafaring has been predominantly a male career, Coast Guard is focusing efforts on recruiting more women into seagoing positions.

As a matter of ongoing management, CCG will continue to build on the human resources initiatives related to the fleet announced in 2007-2008 and on the Fleet Human Resources Development Program launched in 2008-2009, further strengthening a fully integrated, national fleet. In addition, building on research initiated in 2009-2010 on vision standards for seagoing personnel, CCG will develop an action plan to address Bona Fide Occupational Requirements for vision for seagoing positions that are linked to national and international regulatory requirements, ensuring a balance between the needs of those with eyesight disabilities and the safety of all those within the working environment. We will also implement the newly developed Ships’ Crew Certification Program, which will provide incentives to qualified Ships’ Crew to aspire to positions as Ships’ Officers, thereby contributing to more effective succession of seagoing personnel. CCG Management Board (MB) will be presented with a comprehensive proposal for establishing an East Coast Small Craft Training Facility, and Fleet will continue its work to solidify the Operational Women’s Network.

Commitment

Lead

2010-2011

 

Develop detailed syllabi for each of the specific certificates modules and begin implementation of the Ships’ Crew Certification Program.

DG, Fleet

Develop an action plan to address Bona Fide Occupational Requirements for vision for seagoing positions that are linked to national and international regulatory requirements.

DG, Fleet

Develop a comprehensive proposal for consideration by CCG MB for an East Coast Small Craft Training facility.

DG, Fleet

Continue to support the development of the Operational Women's Network.

DG, Fleet

Reinvestment in the Fleet Asset Base

The government has made significant investments in the fleet asset base. In recent federal budgets, the Coast Guard has received $1.4 billion to acquire up to 14 new large vessels.  As we acquire new vessels, we continue to invest in our existing fleet to optimize its availability and reliability. Budget 2009 provided further support to the fleet asset base, providing $175 million ($85 million for 2010-2011) for various capital projects that can start immediately as part of the Economic Action Plan. Including these projects, Fleet will be investing in a total of 45 capital projects with a value of $250.0 million in 2010-2011. 

For a full description and a complete list of projects, see Annex A.

Lifecycle Asset Management Services

To deliver on its mandate to ensure the safe use of Canadian waterways, the Canadian Coast Guard is required to maintain a large base of physical assets. These range from fleet assets (including 116 large and small vessels and air cushion vehicles) to equipment and other moveable assets, including more than 17,443 fixed and floating aids to navigation, as well as the electronic communication and navigation systems needed to support the 22 Marine Communication and Traffic Services Centres across Canada. To manage these assets in a cost-effective and client-centred manner, CCG uses a lifecycle asset management approach.

The Lifecycle Asset Management Services (LCAMS) program provides lifecycle engineering, acquisition, maintenance, and disposal services in support of CCG’s non-fleet assets, and lifecycle engineering in support of CCG’s fleet assets (vessel acquisition and maintenance is provided through the Fleet Operational Readiness program). The LCAMS program ensures that asset capability, reliability, availability and value are satisfied at minimum lifecycle cost, thereby improving the efficiency of CCG program delivery to Canadians.

What we do…

  • Provide partner/client programs with advice and recommendations about the procurement or production/maintenance of assets or services;
  • Prepare engineering drawings and specifications, acquire necessary assets or services, and build or set up requested technical solutions;
  • Conduct the predictive, preventative and corrective maintenance actions required to preserve or restore the operating capability and reliability of assets, systems, and equipment; and
  • Ensure the economical, safe, and environmentally responsible disposal of assets, systems and equipment.

The Lifecycle Asset Management Services program is delivered by…

  • CCG Integrated Technical Services (ITS). Over 950 engineers, technicians, technologists, trades people, managers, and support staff located in over 70 workshops and offices across the five CCG regions and national headquarters work to ensure that CCG assets are available and reliable to support key programs such as Fleet Operational Readiness, Aids to Navigation, and Marine Communication and Traffic Services.

Who we serve…

The LCAMS program’s main clients are the Maritime Services and Fleet directorates. LCAMS also provides services on behalf of other government departments, such as Transport Canada’s program for the inspection of ship radios.

Looking Forward…

Building on the recent LCAMS Program Evaluation, CCG will continue to strengthen its management practices and systems to achieve the LCAMS program outcome of having reliable CCG assets available for CCG programs. Looking ahead, the program will focus on strengthening relationships with CCG partners, and on improving its internal management processes and tools for program planning, operational planning and performance monitoring, and performance improvements. The program will also focus on having a dedicated and skilled workforce to manage and deliver LCAMS program services, as well as on ensuring sound stewardship of the financial resources and information needed to manage and deliver asset management services.

Lifecycle Asset Management Services

Provides these services…

Measured this way…*

With these targets…

CCG Major Capital Asset Acquisition (non-Fleet)

Percentage of major capital projects milestones achieved on schedule

90%

Re-investment rate into CCG non-fleet Asset base (rolling three year average)

5%

CCG Non-Fleet Assets Maintenance [i.e. Aids to navigation and MCTS]

Percentage of program/service days delivered as per SLA, as influenced by maintenance

95%

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To achieve this result…

Measured this way…*

With these targets…

CCG Programs/Services are operational within acceptable targets

Percentage of Service Level Agreements met

95%

* These are the performance indicators in the CCG Performance Measurement Framework.

Table 13: Lifecycle Asset Management Services Resource Profile, 2010-2011 (thousands of dollars)

Region

Salary

O&M

Total

Newfoundland and Labrador 8,312.1 3,640.5 11,952.6
Maritimes 9,697.4 3,685.7 13,383.1
Quebec 9,115.2 5,613.8 14,728.9
Central & Arctic 10,103.3 3,079.4 13,182.7
Pacific 9,895.9 3,978.5 13,874.4
National Capital Region* 6,339.9 5,858.8 12,198.7
Direct Program Total 53,463.7 25,856.7 79,320.3

* The NCR is responsible for the National Engineering function, as well as for the lifecycle management of several nationally used CCG information systems.

Key Initiatives

Lifecycle Management System Guidance Manual

The Lifecycle Management System (LCMS) is a common, standard, structured approach to effectively managing CCG assets.  This standard approach has an asset lifecycle perspective, integrates the efforts of all of the necessary technical disciplines, and is used to manage the total cost of ownership of an asset over its lifetime. A Lifecycle Management System Guidance Manual has been developed to document this standard approach and it is being used to provide training on lifecycle asset management within the CCG.

Commitment

Lead

2010-2011

 

Publish the Lifecycle Management System (LCMS) Concept Manual.

DG, ITS

Deliver a minimum of 4 LCM training courses for HQ staff.

DG, ITS

Continue to deliver LCMS training sessions to regional staff.

ACs

Deploy an Asset Breakdown Structure (ABS) code generator for all vessel classes.

DG, ITS

Asset Management System

CCG’s Asset Management System (AMS) makes possible efficient and comprehensive lifecycle management within CCG by:

  • Providing a focal point for standardizing maintenance procedures and materiel management practices, thereby increasing  efficiency and improving the quality of services;
  • Allowing the tracking of maintenance history and identifying actual maintenance costs, thereby increasing efficiency and improving the quality of services; and
  • Instituting a system for authorizing, scheduling, and tracking the maintenance work undertaken by CCG staff.

AMS consists of two component systems: MAINTelligence, which is used onboard large vessels, and MAXIMO, which is used for shore-based assets and station-based vessels.

Commitment

In response to…

Lead

2010-2011

 

 

Install the inventory management module of Asset Management System onboard selected CCG vessels.

AG

DG, ITS

Deploy MAINTelligence on nine large vessels.

AG

DG, ITS

Deliver a minimum of four MAXIMO training sessions to HQ ITS staff.

AG

DG, ITS

Deliver MAXIMO training sessions to regional ITS staff.

AG

ACs

Improved Maintenance of the Existing Fleet

See the section ‘Fleet Operational Readiness’ for further details on improving the maintenance of the existing Fleet.

Improved Maintenance of Existing Shore-based Infrastructure

ITS is committed to delivering asset management services as efficiently as possible. To do so, ITS strives to continuously improve its maintenance practices for the existing shore-based infrastructure. This, in turn, improves the availability and reliability of our shore-based infrastructure. In addition to developing the Long-term Plan for shore-based infrastructure, ITS will focus on putting in place or updating the maintenance plans and manuals that are fundamental to ITS’s ongoing commitment to provide planned maintenance services.

Commitment

 

Lead

2010-2011

 

 

Further develop and implement standardized engineering and maintenance manuals for selected CCG assets:

AG

DG, ITS

  • Publish and implement an engineering and maintenance manual for marine and civil infrastructure.

 

DG, ITS

ACs

  • Develop an engineering and maintenance manual for electronics and informatics, including communications and training materials.

 

DG, ITS

2011-2012

 

 

  • Deliver standardized maintenance plans for selected shore-based infrastructure in accordance with strategy and procedures.

 

DG, ITS

  • Implement standardized maintenance plans for selected shore-based infrastructure in accordance with overall strategies and procedures.

 

ACs

2012-2013

 

 

  • Publish and implementation engineering and maintenance manual for electronics and informatics.

 

ACs

Technical Solution Centres (Electronics)

The Technical Solution Centre (TSC) is a service delivery model that focusses on maintenance services provided to MCTS partners.  TSC has three service delivery elements:

  1. National Service Level Agreements (SLAs) establishing expectations for the Centres and the relationship between the partners/clients and ITS. The use of SLAs is intended to ensure that partners and clients are satisfied with our services.
  2. A solutions centre in each region that allows partners/clients to raise service requests for the repair of assets/equipment; and
  3. The ability within ITS to troubleshoot and remotely restore asset functionality. 

TSC has been in operation in the Quebec Region and is being implemented in all other CCG Regions. Since the Quebec Region has been using this service delivery model for some time, the region will launch a pilot project for expanding the use of the TSC to manage services for ship-board electronic networks.  By optimizing maintenance services, TSCs ensure program availability, program reliability, and partner/client satisfaction. 

Commitment

Lead

2010-2011

 

Publish a national Service Level Agreement for maintenance services.

DG, ITS

Start using Technical Solution Centres (TSCs) in the regions.

ACs

Install remote tools and diagnostics for ship networks as part of the initiative.

AC, QC

Complete all functionality for resetting remote MCTS sites.

AC, NL

Human Resources Initiatives

The Engineering Community

CCG has committed to develop an Engineering Community Workforce Solution Action Plan in order to address the Engineering Community recruitment and retention issues in the community. The objective of the Plan is to:

  • Ensure that valuable corporate knowledge is transferred;
  • Further develop skill sets and allow existing engineering personnel to grow within the organization; and
  • Recruit university-trained and marine engineers.

 Commitment

In response to…

  Lead

 2010-2011

 

 

Implement the Engineering Community Workforce Solution Action Plan.

AG

DG, ITS

DG, MCP

Reinvestment in the Asset Base

The Lifecycle Asset Management Services (LCAMS) program focuses on delivering asset management services for CCG assets during their four lifecycle phases: the concept, acquisition, in-service, and disposal phases. Managing the total lifecycle of CCG assets ensures greater asset reliability, availability, maintainability, and capability to meet CCG program requirements at optimal lifecycle cost. To provide these services, we invest in the infrastructure required to support the delivery of LCAMS, for example, the asset management information systems (AMS) and heavy equipment required to maintain other CCG assets. 

The delivery of CCG programs to Canadians relies significantly on CCG assets such as ships, communication systems, and aids to navigation. Appropriate and timely investments and maintenance activities are therefore required to ensure the availability and reliability of CCG assets.

Because of the average age and deteriorated physical condition of the CCG asset base, important capital investments are being undertaken. The approved reinvestment strategy, based on asset lifecycle and engineering recommendations, is to improve or replace assets that have deteriorated to the point where the usual maintenance activities are insufficient to ensure their reliability and availability. This strategy will bring the existing asset base back to its operating baseline condition. In addition to improvement/replacement investments to address the physical condition of existing assets, CCG undertakes capital investments to modernize its asset base. Improving the physical condition of CCG’s asset base and modernizing this base has a direct impact on the quality and extent of CCG service delivery and the associated ongoing operating and maintenance costs. For further information on the reinvestment strategies by individual CCG programs, refer to the appropriate CCG program description in this chapter.

In total, CCG expects to spend $296.4 million in 2010-2011 on reinvestment in the CCG asset base. For a full description and a complete list of capital investment projects for all CCG programs, see Annex A

Canadian Coast Guard College

2009-2010 Accomplishments

Canadian Coast Guard College

  • Provided training to 142 students in the Officer Training Program
  • Graduated 14 Ship’s Officers and 17 MCTS Officers.
  • Developed an MCTS Refresher Course which will be piloted in April 2010.
  • Provided training to 96 Electronic Technologists and Ships Radio Instructors.
  • Provided SAR/ER training to 119 personnel, 15 in the On-Scene Commander Course.
  • Refurbished 96 student bedroom/living accommodations, replaced pool roof and created an Administrative Wing for offices and central registry, as part of infrastructure renewal.
  • Strengthened Ship’s Officer Recruitment efforts to support a September 2010 intake of 64 students – the largest class since 1987.
  • Fostered knowledge, awareness and partnerships with Aboriginal Communities in the Maritimes to highlight the benefits of training and career opportunities for Aboriginals within the Canadian Coast Guard.

The Canadian Coast Guard College is the main operational and technical training facility for CCG. Its mission is to train and develop marine professionals in support of CCG-mandated programs in marine safety, security, and environmental protection. As CCG’s training centre of expertise, the College aims to deliver quality, bilingual maritime training and services.

The College offers core national educational programs in four streams: CCG Officer Training Program (CCGOTP) and continued technical training for seagoing personnel, Marine Communication and Traffic Services (MCTS), Marine Maintenance and Equipment Training (MMET), and Rescue, Safety, and Environmental Response.

As a residential training facility, the College currently employs approximately 127 people, including 57 instructors and 70 full-time staff dedicated to academic support, general administration and management of the institution, hostelling, and property management.

Canadian Coast Guard College

Provides these services…

Measured this way…*

With these targets…

Qualified personnel.  Graduates of Coast Guard Officer Training Plan (CGOTP)

Number of Graduates (officers)

23

Trained personnel.  Certification training for MCTS Officers

Percentage of courses delivered / courses planned

100%

Trained personnel.  Professional development training (MMET/ER/SAR)

Percentage of courses delivered / courses planned, in conjunction with Program Managers

100%

arrow - down

To achieve this result…

Measured this way…*

With these targets…

CCG has qualified Marine Professionals

Percentage of target delivered versus planned, as set out in the CCG HR Plan

100%

* These are the performance indicators in the CCG Performance Measurement Framework.

Table 14: Number of Cadets at the Canadian Coast Guard College

Officer Training Program – Ships’ Officers

Total Number of Students

Fiscal year 2010-2011

188 Students

Fiscal Year 2011-2012

229 Students

Fiscal Year 2012-2013

269 Students

* Based on September 2010 class intake of 64 students per year.

MCTS Program – Radio Operators

Total Number of Students

2010-2011

20*

2011-2012

19

2012-2013

17

* Based on forecasted regional requirement.

Table 15: Coast Guard College Resource Profile, 2010-2011 (thousands of dollars)

Region

Salary

O&M

Total

Canadian Coast Guard College

8,063.0 4,349.1 12,412.1

Direct Program Total

8,063.0

4,349.1

12,412.1

Coast Guard Fleet Operational Readiness Allocation

-

-

-

Lifecycle Asset Management Services Allocation

120.2

58.1

178.4

Total Service Cost

8,183.2

4,407.2

12,590.5

Key Initiatives

Canadian Coast Guard College Transformation Initiative

The Coast Guard College developed a Transformation Plan in 2009-2010 to renew the College’s organizational structure to more effectively respond to the growing demand for Coast Guard training. Implementation of the transformation plan will continue into 2010-2011, ensuring that the necessary accountability and governance frameworks are in place to respond to operational training demands now and well into the future. Enhancements in language training capacity, simulation technology, and infrastructure will ensure the College has the tools necessary to enable Coast Guard to serve Canadians in their language of choice.

The College plans to increase the annual officer-cadet intake from 48 to 64 beginning in September 2010, to maximize the College’s training capacity. This number may be adjusted from year to year based on the changing needs of the CCG workforce. In order to meet recruitment needs in 2009-2010, the College participated in career fairs and school visits, and advertised in various electronic and print media.

International Activities

2009-2010 Accomplishments

International Activities

  • Hosted a delegation of the Chilean Navy interested in our operations, and in our expertise in the Arctic in particular.
  • Hosted its fourth multi-departmental Summit with the United States Coast Guard, in Quebec City, Quebec.
  • Led multi-departmental teams at the Summits of both the North Pacific Coast Guard Forum (held in Busan, Republic of Korea) and the North Atlantic Coast Guard Forum (held in Akureyri, Iceland).
  • Along with other members of the North Pacific Coast Guard Forum, participated in a major maritime exercise, organized by the US Coast Guard and held in Puget Sound, to test and improve Forum members’ ability to collaborate on the water.
  • On behalf of the Government of Canada and a multi-departmental team, CCG hosted the 11th North Pacific Coast Guard Forum Experts’ Meeting in Victoria, British Columbia.
  • Hosted the 2009 summit between CCG and the USCG, which concluded with the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding on Ship Design and Construction.
  • Participated in the annual Canada-United States Joint Marine Pollution Contingency Plan.  CCG also participated in multiple joint SAR and ER exercises with the USCG.

Much of CCG’s work has an international dimension. Because our maritime interests are shared with other countries, we work with related organizations at the international level to advance our common objectives. We achieve this by participating in a variety of international fora, providing expert advice to foreign governments on coast guard operational issues, and sharing best practices.

Below are a few examples of our international activities:

  • We lead a multi-departmental team at the North Pacific Coast Guard Forum (NPCGF), a six-nation organization with the objective of ensuring safe and secure waters in the North Pacific region by means of enhanced multilateral information sharing. Two meetings are held every year: the Experts Meeting, where working groups discuss a range of practical issues; and the Summit of Principals, when the lead representatives of the member countries review and approve the recommendations of the experts and establish the Forum’s direction for the following year. Responsibility to host the meetings is rotational; 2010 is CCG’s year to host. The Experts Meeting was successfully held in Victoria, British Columbia, and work is well under way to receive the principals in Vancouver in September 2010.

  • CCG leads a similar multidepartmental team at the North Atlantic Coast Guard Forum (NACGF), which is a predominantly European Union-based 20-nation group. Its members are also focussed on achieving efficiencies in safety and security, but in the North Atlantic maritime region. CCG will lead the Canadian delegation to the September Summit in Norway and the Experts Meeting the following March, which will be hosted by France.

  • Our work with international organizations, such as the International Maritime Organization (IMO) and the International Association of Marine Aids to Navigation and Lighthouse Authorities (IALA), is on-going. These efforts are aimed at developing rules, regulations, policy, and technology for safe and secure marine navigation. These organizations also develop and recommend technical standards for aids to navigation and automated identification systems (AIS) – areas that are among CCG’s core responsibilities and activities here in Canada.

  • As neighbours, CCG and USCG share not only maritime interests but also a number of clients and stakeholders. Our mutual efforts at continuous improvement include performing joint exercises on a regular basis. An annual summit of the leadership of the two Coast Guards provides ongoing guidance for this valuable and effective partnership. The spirit of partnership was furthered at the 2009 Summit with the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding on Ship Design and Construction. The two organizations will share valuable technical and scientific information on research, design, analysis, development, testing, and evaluation of ship design and construction techniques. While CCG hosted the 2009 Summit, the USCG will receive the CCG-led multidepartmental team in Boston in 2010.

  • As part of our philosophy of and commitment to sharing best practices to achieve safety and security in the maritime environment, CCG welcomes foreign coast guard delegations. In 2009, a number of senior officers with the Chilean Navy visited our headquarters to learn more about our activities and expertise in the Canadian Arctic.

  • A Memorandum of Understanding between the CCG and the Korea Coast Guard signed in 2008 aims to promote enhanced cooperation and understanding between our organizations. An officer of the Korea agency is currently positioned in our Pacific Region.

Commitment

Lead

2010-2011

 

Host the Summit of the North Pacific Coast Guard Forum in Vancouver, British Columbia.

AC, Pacific

Participate in the fifth annual CCG-US Coast Guard Summit in Boston.

Commissioner

Continue to provide a web platform for the North Atlantic Coast Guard Forum.

AC, NL

2011-2012

 

Host the sixth annual CCG-US Coast Guard Summit.

Commissioner

2012-2013

 

Begin planning efforts to host a major maritime exercise in 2013 involving other members of the North Pacific Coast Guard Forum.

AC, Pacific

1 Bathymetry - the measurement of the depth of bodies of water.

2 Panamax vessels are those whose dimensions are such that they can fit through the locks of the Panama Canal. Post-Panamax vessels are larger than Panamax vessels, and they therefore cannot fit through the locks of the Panama Canal. These vessels are usually more than 32.2 metres wide.

3 An ab-initio is a person who is recruited and selected to participate in the MCTS Officer Training and Certification program in order to acquire the knowledge and skill requirements of a MCTS Officer.