ARCHIVED - Canadian Coast Guard Business Plan 2010-2013

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Section 2: Where We Are Now

CCG's risks and challenges have been identified in several sources:

  • Our 2006 A-Base Review;
  • The 2007 Report of the Auditor General;
  • An environmental scan conducted in Fall 2009; and
  • Our 2009 risk profile.

In 2009, CCG updated its risk profile. This involved taking a careful look at the environment in which we operate, as well as identifying and assessing the risks and challenges that could prevent us from achieving our objectives. We also identified mitigation efforts to help us manage those risks. This review confirmed that the risks are largely unchanged from the previous risk profile, which was carried out in 2006. These results were incorporated into our priority-setting and decision-making exercises.

We will respond to this challenge/risk…

With these strategies or key initiatives…

Which are described in detail…

Securing the Next Generation of Human Resources 1

(Also identified in DFO's Corporate Risk Profile, as Human Capital)

In looking ahead over the next few years, CCG is expecting attrition rates to rise. By 2014, CCG anticipates that approximately 1,372 employees (31% of our total workforce) will leave the Agency. This includes the potential loss of 786 employees from our at-risk groups (Ships' Officers, Ships' Crew, Marine Communication and Traffic Services Officers, Marine Electronics Technologists and the Engineering Community) which represents 57% of total projected departures.

CCG plans to address these challenges by focussing on: a qualified and representative workforce, developing and supporting people, and a fair and effective management. Key initiatives will help support recruitment and retention efforts within the five at-risk groups.

A Qualified and Representative Workforce

In Section 3, Priority 1: Our People

Develop and Support People

In Section 3, Priority 1: Our People

Fair and Effective Management

In Section 3, Priority 1: Our People

Marine Communication and Traffic Services Technical Training

In Section 5, Marine Communication and Traffic Services

Fleet Operational Readiness Human Resources Initiatives

In Section 5, Fleet Operational Readiness

The Engineering Community

In Section 5, Lifecycle Asset Management Services

Canadian Coast Guard College Transformation Initiative

In Section 5, Canadian Coast Guard College

Evolving Demand for Coast Guard Services (Also identified in DFO's Corporate Risk Profile, as Stakeholder Expectations)

Despite the recent global economic downturn, marine traffic is expected to increase in the medium to longer term. Increased traffic and rapid technological advancements in the marine industry, such as increasing offshore oil and gas exploration and climate-change impacts (including fluctuating water levels and the potential for lengthening of shipping seasons), are expected to place increased demands on Coast Guard Maritime Services programs (including Aids to Navigation, Icebreaking, Search and Rescue, Environmental Response, Marine Communication and Traffic Services and Waterways Management). CCG also needs to be in a position to respond to the evolving maritime needs of the Government of Canada. The increasing emphasis on the Arctic, for example, will create both challenges and opportunities for Coast Guard. CCG will have to balance the needs, demands and expectations of Canadians, clients and stakeholders within available resources.

Updating the Coast Guard's Long-term Fleet Renewal Plan

In Section 3, Priority 2: Our Assets

Procurement of New and Replacement Vessels

In Section 3, Priority 2: Our Assets

Long-term Planning for Shore-based Infrastructure

In Section 3, Priority 2: Our Assets

e-Navigation

In Section 3, Priority 3: Our Future

Strengthening our Ability to Meet Obligations in the Arctic

In Section 3, Priority 3: Our Future

Review of Lightstation Services

In Section 5, Aids to Navigation

Post-Panamax Study, St. Lawrence River

In Section 5, Waterways Management Services

NAVAREAs (Navigational Areas)

In Section 5, Marine Communication and Traffic Services

Health of the Oceans

In Section 5, Environmental Response Services

Strategic Program Framework for CCG's Maritime Services

In Section 6

Service Level Agreements with DFO Clients

In Section 6

Aging Infrastructure*

(Also identified in DFO's Corporate Risk Profile, as Physical Infrastructure)

The CCG fleet of 40 large vessels continues to deteriorate, affecting vessel reliability and the ability to meet program demands. As the vessels age, more breakdowns occur and maintenance costs increase. In the past few federal budgets, the Coast Guard received $1.4 billion to acquire 14 new large vessels and an additional $27.3M in Budget 2010 for an Air Cushion Vehicle. However, it will take several years to acquire all these vessels. Budget 2009 provided $175 million, through the Economic Action Plan, to acquire 98 small boats and barges, and to conduct refits and vessel life extensions on 5 large vessels, which will help the transition.

Despite significant investment since 2003, our shore-based infrastructure (e.g., CCG bases, fixed aids to navigation, radio towers, and Marine Communication and Traffic Services Centres) is beyond its operational life expectancy and continues to deteriorate. The challenge is to acquire and maintain the assets needed to deliver services in light of the aging infrastructure and to respond to rapid technological changes, for example, navigational services moving away from traditional physical aids toward more modern electronic and information-based service.

Updating the Coast Guard's Long-term Fleet Renewal Plan

In Section 3, Priority 2: Our Assets

Procurement of New and Replacement Vessels

In Section 3, Priority 2: Our Assets

Economic Action Plan

In Section 3, Priority 2: Our Assets

Long-term Planning for Shore-based Infrastructure

In Section 3, Priority 2: Our Assets

Aids to Navigation of the 21st Century (AToN21)

In Section 5, Aids to Navigation

Improved Maintenance of the Existing Fleet

In Section 5, Fleet Operational Readiness

Improved Maintenance of Existing Shore-based Infrastructure

In Section 5, Lifecycle Asset Management Services

Functioning as a Truly National Institution

Both the Auditor General and our own internal A-Base Review indicated that we need greater consistency in the design and delivery of our national program while safeguarding regional operational authority and responsibilities.

Lifecycle Management System Guidance Manual

In Section 5, Lifecycle Asset Management Services

Asset Management System

In Section 5, Lifecycle Asset Management Services

Improved Maintenance of Existing Shore-based Infrastructure

In Section 5, Lifecycle Asset Management Services

Communication Protocols

In Section 6

Stronger Canadian Coast Guard Identity

In Section 6

Partnerships in Service Delivery*

(Also identified in DFO's Corporate Risk Profile, as Partnering and Collaboration)

CCG relies on the assistance of third parties to address functions critical to the delivery of CCG programs and services, such as corporate services, acquisitions, and procurement. Simplifying federal procurement is a top priority of the government, and Coast Guard must work closely with other federal departments and central agencies to develop more streamlined processes to acquire assets and capabilities needed for the delivery of services. The Agency also works with and relies on other federal government departments, agencies, and volunteers (such as the Canadian Coast Guard Auxiliary (CCGA) and a variety of other stakeholders) to help fulfil federal mandates for Canadians. CCG's challenge in this regard is to strengthen the effectiveness of our partnerships.

Procurement of New and Replacement Vessels

In Section 3, Priority 2: Our Assets

e-Navigation

In Section 3, Priority 3: Our Future

Post-Panamax Study, St. Lawrence River

In Section 5, Waterways Management Services

Marine Security Enforcement Team

In Section 5, Maritime Security

Marine Security Operations Centres

In Section 5, Maritime Security

Review of the Working Relationship with DFO's Human Resources and Corporate Services

In Section 6

Managing Information*

(Also identified in DFO's Corporate Risk Profile, as Information for Decision Making)

A number of reports, reviews, and exercises have highlighted the need for us to improve our ability to acquire, apply, manage and communicate the information needed for business, operational, maintenance and investment decision-making, as well as performance measurement. Such information is critical to support day-to-day operations and for strategic decision-making.

Long Term Planning for Shore-based Infrastructure

In Section 3, Priority 2: Our Assets

Upgrade Vessel Traffic Information Systems

In Section 3, Priority 2: Our Assets

Research and Development Strategy

In Section 3, Priority 3: Our Future

Strategic Program Framework for CCG's Maritime Services

In Section 6

Maritime Security

Since September 2001, CCG has been a core partner in Canada's multi-agency approach to maritime security. CCG has a broad mandate to provide support to other government departments, and the government and Canadians expect that CCG will be ready and able to respond in support of other departments' security mandates. As a result, CCG has received dedicated national security funding to deliver support for maritime security activities. Because the CCG contribution to the collaborative delivery of maritime security is one of proactive support within partnerships with the federal intelligence and enforcement communities, it is important to clearly articulate CCG's role both within the organization and for our partners.

Procurement of New and Replacement Vessels

In Section 3, Priority 2: Our Assets

Upgrade Vessel Traffic Information Systems

In Section 3, Priority 2: Our Assets

Strengthening Our Ability to Meet Obligations in the Arctic

In Section 3, Priority 3: Our Future

Marine Security Enforcement Team

In Section 5, Maritime Security

Marine Security Operations Centres

In Section 5, Maritime Security

Automatic Identification System

In Section 5, Maritime Security

Long Range Identification and Tracking System

In Section 5, Maritime Security

1 Identified as a key risk in the CCG Corporate Risk Profile 2009