Appendices

Annex A: Marine Advisory Board Industry Requirements

The following information is an extract from the 2010 Regional Icebreaking Committee reports that define the number and deployment of icebreakers required for the support of commercial shipping.

Great Lakes Requirements

Great Lakes additional resources (interim) and asset renewal (long term) for a 3rd and 4th icebreaking capable vessel for Great Lakes is recommended:

  1. The current dedicated Great Lakes icebreaking resources (CCGS Griffon and CCGS Samuel Risley) should be allocated to the upper lakes service (above the Welland Canal). This equates to one type 1050 class vessel and one type 1100 class vessel.
  2. One additional icebreaking resource for the Upper Great Lakes (above the Welland Canal) to respond to under served areas such as Western Lake Superior, Thunder Bay, and Georgian Bay. This would equate to one type 1050 class vessel or one type 1100 vessel class vessel.
  3. Lake Ontario and the St. Lawrence Seaway need a dedicated icebreaking resource with flexibility to meet other departmental program needs with redundancy availability. This additional resource would have the flexibility of allocation eastward or westward as needed under a “zonal approach” of resource management. This would equate to one type 1050 class vessel or one type 1100 class vessel.
  4. Continuation of icebreaking support by Quebec Region for that portion of the Seaway which falls within its regional boundaries – St. Lambert to Beauharnois. This would equate to the use of one type 1100 class vessel, one type 1000 class vessel, and one air cushion vehicle (Lac St. Louis). Subject to ice conditions, this support would extend as far upstream as Lake St. François to the US Seaway locks.
  5. One type 1200 class vessel to assist as required from the Seaway to Lake Superior, in the event of a severe ice season during the period March 21 to April 15.

Quebec Requirements

Changes from the 1997 program:

  1. Add a category between December 1 and December 15: St. Lawrence: a unit (type 1100 or 1200 class vessel) available, as needed
  2. From December 15 to late December:
    • Great Lakes and Seaway: add the Lac Saint-François (upstream Beauharnois) for the responsibilities of the first unit.
    • Great Lakes and Seaway: Amend the first unit: change 1 type 1200 class vessel to 1 type 1100 class vessel (except during the difficult years when we will need a type 1200 class vessel)
  3. January:
    • Center of the Gulf: Two dedicated units needed:
      • 1 type 1200 class vessel from 1 January
      • 1 type 1200 class vessel from 20 January
  4. February to March 10:
    • Center of the Gulf: Add a type 1200 class vessel
  5. From March 11 to 31:
    1. Great Lakes and Seaway: Add flexibility in providing a type 1100 or 1200 class vessel, depending on conditions (rather than a type 1200 class vessel)
    2. St. Lawrence: Add a type 1100 class vessel at Lac Saint-Pierre
  6. From April 1 to 15:
    • Great Lakes and Seaway: Add a hovercraft (downstream from Beauharnois)

Maritimes Requirements

The following requirements for icebreaking services were reviewed for Chaleur Bay, Miscou and Northumberland:

  1. December 15 to the end of December: 1 type 1100 unit required.
  2. January: 1 type 1100 unit and 1 type 1200 unit. Due to ice conditions in the Northumberland Strait, Chaleur Bay and Eastern PEI, a type 1200 unit should be dedicated to the area for the entire ice season. Assistance of a type 1200 unit from Central Gulf, as required, should also be maintained.
  3. February to March 10: 1 type 1100 unit and 1 type 1200 unit dedicated to area. Assistance of a type 1200 unit from Central Gulf, as required, should also be maintained.
  4. March 11 to the end of March: 1 type 1100 unit and 1 type 1200 unit dedicated to area. Assistance of a type 1200 unit from Central Gulf, as required, should also be maintained.
  5. Beginning of April to April 15: 2 type 1100 units. Assistance of a type 1200 unit from Central Gulf, as required.

Newfoundland and Labrador Requirements

  1. Icebreaking levels of service will continue to be required well into the future in order to continue to support provincial ferry operations, including:
    • Blanc Sablon to St. Barbe / Cornerbrook
    • Green Bay (Shoal Arm - Little Bay Islands - Pelley's Island – Long Island)
    • St. Brendan's – Burnside
    • Burgeo – Ramea
    • Change Islands – Fogo Island
  2. With global warming and more northern marine routes becoming available, there may be growing demand to extend current operating seasons for the coastal Labrador routes. This may also require additional icebreaking services during the shoulder seasons that the Canadian Coast Guard (CCG) should consider when developing-long term plans.

Arctic Requirements

  1. In the Arctic, commercial vessels are operating in the Arctic prior to and after icebreaker services are available. As the population increases, and exploration and development expand, the pressure on the commercial fleet will only increase. As a result, the CCG should consider alternatives that will permit increase availability of CCG services commensurate with commercial and climatological realities.
  2. As the fleet ages, refit and maintenance time is likely to increase. This, coupled with climate change, is likely to result in conflicts with Winter/Spring icebreaking duties in the south and Summer/Autumn duties in the Arctic. We would like to hear what contingencies are contemplated to address this potential conflict.
  3. As Central and Arctic do not have dedicated breakers one has to ask the question: Should there be a heavy icebreaker tasked to Arctic operations year round rather than just summertime operations?
  4. We currently know of a plan to build one heavy icebreaker, while at the same time, retire one icebreaker. This does essentially nothing to improve Levels of Service. If this understanding is correct, it would seem to contradict much of what is being touted by the government as their increased commitment to the North.

Annex B: List of Canadian Coast Guard Icebreakers

The following table is a list of icebreakers and air cushion vehicles that may be utilized for icebreaking operations. These vessels are also used to support other Canadian Coast Guard (CCG) and Department of Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) programs and undergo regular maintenance periods, and are, therefore, not always available.

At this time, with the exception of the new polar icebreaker CCGS John Diefenbaker, no new building plans have been approved for the replacement of these icebreakers.

List of Canadian Coast Guard Icebreakers
Name Region Type Built Length (m) Draft (m) Power (kw)
Louis S. St-Laurent N Heavy Icebreaker 1969 120 10 20,142
Terry Fox N Heavy Icebreaker 1983 88 8 17,300
Amundsen Q Medium Icebreaker 1979 98 7 10,142
Des Groseilliers Q Medium Icebreaker 1982 98 7 10,142
Henry Larsen N Medium Icebreaker 1987 100 7 12,174
Pierre Radisson Q Medium Icebreaker 1978 98 7 10,142
Sir Wilfrid Laurier P High Endurance Multi-Tasked Vessels 1986 83 6 5,250
Edward Cornwallis M High Endurance Multi-Tasked Vessels 1986 83 6 5,250
George R. Pearkes N High Endurance Multi-Tasked Vessels 1986 83 6 5,250
Ann Harvey N High Endurance Multi-Tasked Vessels 1987 83 6 5,250
Martha L. Black Q High Endurance Multi-Tasked Vessels 1986 83 6 5,250
Sir William Alexander M High Endurance Multi-Tasked Vessels 1986 83 6 5,250
Griffon C High Endurance Multi-Tasked Vessels 1970 71 5 2,984
Samuel Risley C Medium Endurance Multi-Tasked Vessels 1985 70 6 6,595
Earl Grey M Medium Endurance Multi-Tasked Vessels 1986 70 5 6,500
Tracy Q Medium Endurance Multi-Tasked Vessels 1968 55 4 1,492
Sipu-muin Q Air Cushioned Vehicles 1998 28 - 2,818
Mamilossa Q Air Cushioned Vehicles 2009 28 - 3,281
Canadian Coast Guard Icebreaker at sea

Annex C: Planned Icebreaker Deployment 2011-2016

Winter Operations

The CCGS Louis S. St-Laurent will be utilized when a medium or heavy icebreaker is not available for winter icebreaking operations. The CCGS Amundsen will be used for 6 months in the winter season for icebreaking, and will spend the other six months in the Arctic to support science projects. Icebreakers may be replaced from time to time with vessels of higher or lower capability, subject to the operational requirements and resource availability of the Canadian Coast Guard (CCG). All vessels will be multi-tasked to Search and Rescue (SAR) or Aids to Navigation, as much as possible, to optimize the effectiveness of the fleet.

November:
Icebreaker Deployment Details
1 x Light Labrador Coast from November 2 to December 6. The primary program of this vessel is to support to Aids to Navigation, with Icebreaking as its secondary program.
December:
Icebreaker Deployment Details
1 x Light Thunder Bay and the Soo area, from December 21 to the end of December.
1 x Light Sarnia area, from December 24 to the end of December.
1 x Light Trois-Rivières, from December 15 to end of December.
1 x Light Seaway to Trois-Rivières, from December 21 to end of December.
1 x Air Cushioned Vehicles Lac St-Pierre, from December 19 to the end of December.
1 x Medium Quebec, from December 13. This unit may switch with the light icebreaker to support the Seaway, if required.
1 x Medium Saguenay, from December 14 to the end of December.
1 x Medium Estuary, from December 22 to the end of December.
1 x Light Gaspe, Chaleur Bay and Northumberland Strait, from December 21 to the end of December.
1 x Medium St. Lawrence River and northern Gulf as required, from December 21 to the end of December.
1 x Light East/Northeast Coast Newfoundland, from December 28. Primary program: SAR, secondary program: Icebreaking.
January:
Icebreaker Deployment Details
1 x Light Thunder Bay and the St. Mary's River area until the closure of the Soo locks in mid-January. The unit will then be shifted to the Sarnia area.
1 x Light Sarnia area
1 x Air Cushioned Vehicles Lac St-Pierre
1 x Air Cushioned Vehicles Lac St-Pierre, from January 2
2 x Light Trois-Rivières
1 x Medium Quebec
1 x Medium Saguenay
1 x Medium Estuary
1 x Light Gaspe, Chaleur Bay and Northumberland Strait, from January 3.
1 x Medium Central Gulf from January 1, rover from the West Coast Newfoundland, Strait of Belle Isle to NE Coast Newfoundland, as required.
1 x Light East/Northeast Coast Newfoundland. Primary program: SAR, secondary program: Icebreaking.
1 x Light West Coast Newfoundland. Primary program: SAR, secondary program: Icebreaking.
February:
Icebreaker Deployment Details
2 x Light Sarnia area
2 x Air Cushioned Vehicles Lac St-Pierre (one hovercraft on 1 hour standby; the second on 24 hour notice)
2 x Light Trois-Rivières
1 x Medium Quebec
1 x Medium Saguenay
1 x Medium Estuary
1 x Light Gaspe, Chaleur Bay and Northumberland Strait.
1 x Medium Central Gulf. West Coast Newfoundland to Strait of Belle Isle.
1 x Heavy Central Gulf, from February 15. Assistance to other areas as required.
1 x Light West Coast Newfoundland. Primary program: SAR, secondary program Icebreaking.
1 x Light East/Northeast Coast Newfoundland. Primary program: SAR, secondary program: Icebreaking.
March:
Icebreaker Deployment Details
2 x Light Great Lakes.
1 x Air Cushioned Vehicles Lac St-Pierre.
1 x Air Cushioned Vehicles Lac St-Pierre. Assistance to the Seaway as required.
1 x Light Trois-Rivières.
1 x Light Trois-Rivières. Assistance to the Seaway to Lake Ontario as required.
1 x Medium Quebec. This unit may switch with the light icebreaker to support the Seaway, if required.
1 x Medium Saguenay until March 18.
1 x Medium Estuary.
1 x Light Gaspe, Chaleur Bay and Northumberland Strait.
1 x Heavy Central Gulf. Assistance to other areas as required.
1 x Medium West Coast Newfoundland to Strait of Belle Isle. Assistance in the Central Gulf as required.
1 x Light West Coast Newfoundland. Primary program: SAR; secondary program: Icebreaking.
1 x Light Sydney area from March 15. Primary program: SAR; secondary program: Icebreaking.
1 x Light East/Northeast Coast Newfoundland. Primary program: SAR; secondary program: Icebreaking.
April:
Icebreaker Deployment Details
2 x Light Support to all Great Lakes as required until April 15.
1 x Air Cushioned Vehicles Lac. St-Pierre until April 3.
1 x Air Cushioned Vehicles Chaleur Bay, SW Gulf as required until end of April.
1 x Light Seaway as required until April 6.
1 x Medium Estuary until April 12.
1 x Light Gaspe, Chaleur Bay and Northumberland Strait as required until April 14.
1 x Heavy Central Gulf, as required until April 16.
1 x Medium Central Gulf, West Coast Newfoundland to Strait of Belle Isle. Assistance in the Central Gulf and North Shore Quebec, as required.
1 x Light West Coast Newfoundland and North Shore Quebec.
1 x Light East/Northeast Coast Newfoundland. Primary program SAR, secondary program Icebreaking.
May:
Icebreaker Deployment Details
1 x Medium Central Gulf. West Coast Newfoundland, Strait of Belle Isle, North Shore Quebec, until May 3.
1 x Light NE Coast Newfoundland and Labrador North Shore Quebec, until May 14.
1 x Light West Coast Newfoundland and North Shore Quebec, until May 17.
June:
Icebreaker Deployment Details
1 x Light Labrador Coast until June 28. This unit is multi-tasked to aids to navigation.

Arctic Operations

The following dates do not include the mobilization period for the Arctic but do include transit time. The CCGS Amundsen is dedicated to Arctic Science and is not used for icebreaking operations during the summer, except in emergency situations. The CCGS Louis S. St-Laurent is dedicated to support science projects or other Government departments during the first part of the Arctic season.

June:
Icebreaker Deployment Details
1 x Medium Eastern Arctic. Departs Quebec on June 22. On scene approximately June 26.
1 x Heavy Eastern Arctic. Departs St. John's on June 25. On scene approximately June 26.
1 x Medium Eastern Arctic. Departs home port on June 29. On scene approximately July 4.
July:
Icebreaker Deployment Details
1 x Medium Eastern Arctic
1 x Heavy Eastern Arctic
1 x Medium Eastern Arctic
1 x Medium Eastern Arctic. Departs the home port on July 5. On scene approximately July 8.
1 x Light Western Arctic. Departs the home port on July 9, arriving off Point Barrow about July 20. Demarcation Point July 23.

Note:

CCGS Louis S. St-Laurent may be dedicated to support science or other government departments during the summer months but is not required to support icebreaking operations until later on in the Arctic shipping season.

August:
Icebreaker Deployment Details
3 x Medium Eastern Arctic
1 x Heavy Eastern Arctic
1 x Light Western Arctic
September:
Icebreaker Deployment Details
2 x Medium Eastern Arctic
1 x Medium Eastern Arctic, returning to the home port on September 27.
1 x Heavy Eastern Arctic
1 x Heavy Eastern or Western Arctic, support to shipping, as required.
1 x Light Western Arctic
October:
Icebreaker Deployment Details
1 x Heavy Eastern Arctic, returning to home port on October 9.
1 x Medium Eastern Arctic, returning to home port on October 25.
1 x Medium Eastern Arctic, returning to home port on October 15.
1 x Light Western Arctic, returning to home port on October 18.
1 x Heavy Western or Eastern Arctic. Shifts to Eastern Arctic in mid October.
November:
Icebreaker Deployment Details
1 x Heavy Eastern Arctic returning to home port on November 18.

Ships and capacity of the icebreaker

  • Heavy Icebreakers
    • CCGS Louis S. St-Laurent
    • CCGS Terry Fox
  • Meduim Icebreakers
    • CCGS Des Groseilliers
    • CCGS Henry Larsen
    • CCGS Pierre Radisson
    • CCGS Amundsen
  • Light Icebreakers
    High Endurance Multi-Tasked Vessels
    • CCGS Ann Harvey
    • CCGS Edward Cornwallis
    • CCGS Georges R. Pearkes
    • CCGS Griffon
    • CCGS Martha L. Black
    • CCGS Sir Wilfrid Laurier
    • CCGS Sir William Alexander
  • Light Icebreakers
    Medium Endurance Multi-Tasked Vessels
    • CCGS Earl Grey
    • CCGS Samuel Risley
    • CCGS Tracy
  • Air Cushioned Vehicles (ACV)
    • CCGS Mamilossa
    • CCGS Sipu Muin

General Notes:

  • The Arctic and Newfoundland & Labrador Regional Marine Advisory Boards did not specify exact dates for their industry requirements. The CCG Icebreaking Program has determined the user requirement dates for both regional MABs based on previous discussions with industry members.
  • Transit to and from the Arctic is included.
  • Mobilization and de-mobilization is not included in the availability.
  • All vessel availability is dependant on CCG priorities.
  • Dates of availability may contain operational gaps or overlaps.
  • Required maintenance and refit, as per the Vessel Maintenance Protocol, will determine availability and will vary from year to year.
  • Total requirements for all clients will drive CCG multi-tasking abilities.
  • Every year there is a degree of uncertainty that may impact CCG Fleet services due to funding.
  • CCG must take into account other requests from OGDs or users of vessel services.
  • Due to the age of the Fleet vessels, CCG reserves the right to move vessels around as required, but no backfilling will be granted.
Comparison of Industry Requirements and Planned Icebreaker Deployment
Icebreaker Capability Vessel Type Areas of Operation Industry Requirements From Industry Requirements To Industry Requirements Number of Days Planned Icebreaker Deployment From Planned Icebreaker Deployment To Planned Icebreaker Deployment Number of Days
Light Medium Endurance Multi-Tasked Vessels Great Lakes December 21 April 15 117 December 21 April 15 117
Light High Endurance Multi-Tasked Vessels Great Lakes December 21 April 15 117 December 24 April 15 114
Light High Endurance Multi-Tasked Vessels Lake Ontario March 10 April 7 29 0
Light High Endurance Multi-Tasked Vessels Lake Superior/
Georgian Bay
December 7 January 15 40 0
Light High Endurance Multi-Tasked Vessels Lake Superior/
Georgian Bay
March 21 April 15 26 0
Air Cushioned Vehicles Air Cushioned Vehicles Lac St-Pierre January 2 March 31 90 January 2 March 31 90
Air Cushioned Vehicles Air Cushioned Vehicles Lac St-Pierre December 19 April 3 107 December 19 April 3 107
Light Medium Endurance Multi-Tasked Vessels Lac St-Pierre December 15 March 31 108 December 15 March 31 108
Light Medium Endurance Multi-Tasked Vessels Lac St-Pierre March 11 March 31 21 0
Light High Endurance Multi-Tasked Vessels Seaway/Trois-Rivières December 1 April 6 128 December 21 April 6 108
Medium Medium Icebreaker Quebec City 15-December April 15 123 December 13 March 31 110
Medium Medium Icebreaker Saguenay March 11 March 31 21 December 14 March 18 96
Heavy Heavy Icebreaker Escoumins, Cacouna, Saguenay December 21 March 10 81 0
Medium Medium Icebreaker Estuary January 1 April 15 106 December 22 April 12 113
Heavy Heavy Icebreaker Gulf January 20 April 15 87 February 15 April 15 61
Medium Medium Icebreaker Gulf February 1 March 31 60 0
Medium Medium Icebreaker Gulf (Rover West to East NL) January 1 May 3 124 December 21 May 3 135
Light Medium Endurance Multi-Tasked Vessels or High Endurance Multi-Tasked Vessels Gaspe North'd Strait Sydney December 21 April 15 117 January 3 April 15 104
Medium Medium Icebreaker Gaspe, Chaleur, North'd Str., Sydney January 1 March 31 91 0
Air Cushioned Vehicles Air Cushioned Vehicles Chaleur Bay, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island April 1 May 1 31 April 1 May 1 31
Light High Endurance Multi-Tasked Vessels Labrador Coast November 2 December 6 35 November 2 December 6 35
Light High Endurance Multi-Tasked Vessels Labrador Coast May 18 June 28 42 May 18 June 28 42
Light High Endurance Multi-Tasked Vessels NE Coast NL January 1 May 14 135 December 28 May 14 139
Medium Medium Icebreaker East NL January 15 May 15 122 0
Light High Endurance Multi-Tasked Vessels West Coast NL, Lower N Shore January 1 May 17 138 January 1 May 17 138
Winter Days 2096 Winter Days 1648
Comparison of Industry Requirements and Planned Icebreaker Deployment
Icebreaker Capability Vessel Type Areas of Operation Industry Requirements From Industry Requirements To Industry Requirements Number of Days Planned Icebreaker Deployment From Planned Icebreaker Deployment To Planned Icebreaker Deployment Number of Days
Medium Medium Icebreaker Eastern Arctic June 22 October 8 109 June 22 September 27 98
Heavy Heavy Icebreaker Eastern Arctic June 25 October 15 113 June 25 October 9 107
Medium Medium Icebreaker Eastern Arctic July 2 October 25 116 July 5 October 25 113
Medium Medium Icebreaker Eastern Arctic June 29 October 15 109 June 29 October 15 109
Light High Endurance Multi-Tasked Vessels Western Arctic July 2 October 18 109 July 9 October 18 102
Heavy Heavy Icebreaker Eastern Arctic September 17 November 18 63 September 17 November 18 63
Arctic Days 619 Arctic Days 592
Total Users 2715 Total Canadian Coast Guard 2240

Planned Icebreaker Deployment

Planned Icebreaker Deployment graph

Annex D: Memorandum Of Understanding Between Central and Arctic, Quebec, Maritimes and Newfoundland and Labrador Regions With Respect To Icebreaking

Purpose

This document provides a framework for the provision of icebreaking services in a zonal approach by the Canadian Coast Guard. This agreement will facilitate the deployment of icebreakers between regions, focusing on increased efficiency of the icebreaking program delivery and on the mutual recognition of each region's accountability to its clients. Regions involved are: Central and Arctic, Québec, Maritimes, and Newfoundland and Labrador. This agreement applies only for sectors located south of 60°N.

Introduction

The Canadian Coast Guard (CCG), as a special operating agency (SOA) of the Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO), serves the public through the delivery of maritime services such as aids to navigation, search and rescue, environmental response, icebreaking, other DFO programs and other government departments.

Icebreaking operations facilitate the informed, safe, and timely movement of maritime traffic and contribute to keeping most ice-bound Canadian ports open for business year-round, preventing flooding on the St. Lawrence River and supporting the marine industry, fishers and numerous coastal communities.

Les opérations de déglaçage facilitent le mouvement informé, sécuritaire et rapide du trafic maritime, en plus d'aider à garder la plupart des ports canadiens envahis par les glaces ouverts toute l'année, à prévenir les inondations sur le fleuve Saint-Laurent, à prêter main-forte à l'industrie maritime, aux pêcheurs, ainsi qu'à de nombreuses communautés côtières.

Responsibilities

CCG Headquarters coordinates and manages the National Icebreaking Program for the benefit of the Regions and the marine community. Headquarters activities include the development of national policy, standards and procedures; program planning and monitoring, evaluating and improving program performance.

Regional Icebreaking Superintendents are responsible for managing the effective delivery of the Icebreaking Program within their regions, participating with operational planning, monitoring of marine shipping in ice, the preparation and dissemination of recommended routings to marine shipping, responding to requests for icebreaker support, discussing the tasking of assigned Icebreaking vessels and aircraft with the Superintendent of the Regional Operations Centre; supporting the Icebreaking Operations Data Information System (IODIS), conducting client and stakeholder consultation, and monitoring and improving program delivery.

Ice Québec will coordinate all icebreaking services along the Main Shipping Route through the Gulf of St. Lawrence from Cabot Strait to Montreal, in consultation with the other regions. Ice Halifax will be responsible for alternate shipping lanes to Gaspé, Chaleurs Bay, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island and Nova Scotia. Ice St. John's will be responsible for the alternate shipping lanes to Newfoundland ports and will assist Ice Quebec with the Lower North Shore as required. Ice Sarnia will coordinate icebreaking activities on the Great Lakes in collaboration with the United States Coast Guard (USCG). Ice Sarnia and Ice Quebec will work jointly for the closing and opening of the St. Lawrence Seaway, with the available icebreaking resources.

During the ice season, the Icebreaking Superintendents are co-located in the Regional Operations Centres (ROC) and, with the Superintendent of the ROC, jointly coordinate the deployment and tasking of assigned CCG icebreaking and aerial reconnaissance resources with their counterparts in the other Regions in order to promote a seamless service delivery of icebreaking services through a zonal approach.

During the year, Icebreaking Superintendents are responsible for regular client consultation and communications; identifying the strategic priorities and operational and capital planning required to meet the National Icebreaking Levels of Service; attending National Icebreaking Program meetings and participating in ice-related projects.

Application of the National Levels of service (LOS) will ensure that the provision of the icebreaking services is consistent across the country.

Principles

In order to maximize the efficiency of the resources used to deliver the Icebreaking Program, a great autonomy should be delegated to the Regional Ice Operations Centres so that they can respond quickly and closely to maritime industry needs and public good. Decisions shall be taken, whenever possible, consistent with the following principles:

  • Staff expertise: Icebreaking Superintendents are senior CCG officers with experience in ice navigation, in order to make sound decisions and to efficiently interact with the Regional Operations Centres, Icebreaker Commanding Officers, pilots and external clients.
  • Close relationship with clients: regular contact with clients to be able to fully understand their needs and ensure their satisfaction in a continuous improvement approach.
  • Team work: The Ice Operations Officers/ Technical Assistants, Ice Service Specialists work together under the supervision of the Icebreaking Superintendents who are responsible for managing the effective delivery of icebreaking services to mariners within their regional limits. They always work in close collaboration with Regional Operations Centre and Marine Communications and Traffic Services (MCTS) staff as well as with their counterparts in other regions.
  • Innovation and Information technology: CCG has invested in the development of new technologies for automating the acquisition of essential strategic information and its distribution to program managers and users, including Icebreaking Operations Data Information System (IODIS), ICEggs, Marinfo, Integrated Ice System, eNavigation systems, Ice Routing Model, etc.

Conflict Resolution

In the event that CCG is unable to meet the Icebreaking Levels of service (LOS) in a specific region and therefore cannot fulfill its mandated obligations, the Regional Ice Superintendents will jointly evaluate the situation and establish priorities that reflect the best possible services to our clients. If required, the Icebreaking and ROC superintendents will re-deploy icebreaking resources to address the priorities. The Manager, Icebreaking Program, Headquarters (HQ), can provide guidance pertaining to Icebreaking Operations levels of service.

In the event of any disputes, the Superintendents will raise the issues with their respective Regional Directors who will review the situation and make a decision, based on all available information.

If it cannot be resolved at the Regional Director's level, it will be elevated to the level of the CCG Assistant Commissioner.

Any conflicts that cannot be resolved at the Assistant Commissioner (AC) level can be brought to the Commissioner for decision.

Duration

This agreement reflects an approach for an effective, transparent Icebreaking Program management regime. The agreement shall be valid for a period of 5 years after which it will be reviewed by all parties.

Signatures

Original signed by S. Decker for
Assistant Commissioner
Canadian Coast Guard Newfoundland and Labrador Region
September 29 2010

Original signed by N. Hurlburt
Assistant Commissioner
Canadian Coast Guard Maritimes Region
October 7 2010

Original signed by M. Demonceaux Assistant Commissioner
Canadian Coast Guard Quebec Region
October 25 2010

Original signed by W. SpurrellAssistant Commissioner
Canadian Coast Guard Central and Arctic Region
November 1 2010

Original signed by J. Thomas Deputy Commissioner Operations
Canadian Coast Guard
November 16 2010

Original signed by M. GregoireCommissioner
Canadian Coast Guard
November 17 2010